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Biden distances himself from Green New Deal during town hall

Biden distances himself from Green New Deal during town hall
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Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenCaitlyn Jenner on Hannity touts Trump: 'He was a disruptor' Argentina launches 'Green Mondays' campaign to cut greenhouse gases On The Money: Federal judge vacates CDC's eviction moratorium | Biden says he's open to compromise on corporate tax rate | Treasury unsure of how long it can stave off default without debt limit hike MORE distanced himself from the Green New Deal at Thursday night’s town hall, telling the audience “my deal is the crucial framework.”

Biden’s comments came in response to ABC host George StephanopoulosGeorge Robert StephanopoulosHarris: I don't think America is a racist country, but we need to speak truth about history Biden meets with TV anchors ahead of joint address CDC director 'cautiously optimistic' about coronavirus situation in US MORE, who pointed to a line in Biden’s climate plan that calls the progressive 2017 resolution “a crucial framework for meeting the climate challenges we face”

“My deal is the crucial framework, not the New Green Deal,” Biden said. “The New Green Deal calls for the elimination of all nonrenewable energy by 2030 — you can't get there. You’re going to need to be able to transition.”

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Biden’s plan does depart from the Green New Deal in a few key ways.

He calls for reaching net-zero emissions by 2050, with the electric sector reaching that goal first, by 2035.

Green New Deal co-sponsor Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOvernight Energy: Update on Biden administration conservation goals | GOP sees opportunity to knock Biden amid rising gas prices | Push for nationwide electric vehicle charging stations The Memo: The GOP's war is already over — Trump won Ocasio-Cortez, Levin introduce revised bill to provide nationwide electric vehicle charging network MORE (D-N.Y.) and other progressives have said the U.S. should reach net-zero emissions by 2030, though the resolution itself calls on all countries to reach net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

And while Biden sees his climate plan as part of a larger economic vision — investing in the technology needed to reduce emissions will spur jobs and growth, he said — the former vice president does not call for a job guarantee or government-provided health care for all. 

"When Biden laid out his own climate plan, he acknowledged that the Green New Deal is a crucial framework — or structure — to arrange thinking on climate because it includes two truths that he carried into his own plan: 1) the urgent need for action, and 2) a recognition of the interconnectedness of our environment and economy,” a Biden campaign official said in a statement.

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“You can see those truths in his plan. But his plan is very much the Biden plan."

Biden’s running mate, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisCaitlyn Jenner on Hannity touts Trump: 'He was a disruptor' Nearly half of women say they're more stressed amid pandemic: survey Alabama museum unveils restored Greyhound bus for Freedom Rides' 60th anniversary MORE (D-Calif.), did embrace the Green New Deal during her own presidential run and introduced legislation to begin implementing certain aspects of the resolution. 

Biden’s plan also does not call for an end to fracking, as those on the left like Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBriahna Joy Gray: Biden campaign promises will struggle if Republicans win back Congress Biden backs COVID-19 vaccine patent waivers McConnell sidesteps Cheney-Trump drama MORE (I-Vt.) have sought. 

But he would bar any new drilling on public lands, which would include any new fracking permits, and a transition away from fossil fuels would undoubtedly limit the industry.

Biden, like other Democrats during the primary, has called for eliminating subsidies to the fossil fuel industry. 

“I would stop giving tax breaks and subsidizing oil. We don't need to subsidize oil any longer,” he said. “We should stop that and save billions of dollars over time.”