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Senate confirms former Michigan governor Granholm as Energy secretary

The Senate on Thursday confirmed Jennifer GranholmJennifer GranholmBiden climate officials make case for infrastructure based on jobs, environment The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - Biden turns focus to gun violence Watch live: Energy secretary to join Psaki at White House press briefing MORE to lead the Energy Department, making her the latest Cabinet nominee to secure confirmation this week.

She was confirmed in a 64-35 vote, with 14 Republicans joining all 50 Senate Democrats in supporting her nomination.

Granholm, who served as governor of Michigan from 2003-2011, will be tasked with helping President BidenJoe BidenBiden taps California workplace safety leader to head up OSHA Romney blasts end of filibuster, expansion of SCOTUS US mulling cash payments to help curb migration MORE transition the U.S. toward clean energy as part of his goal to put the country on a path toward carbon neutrality by 2050.

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Her supporters have praised the work she did on jobs and clean energy in Michigan.

“I saw how she handled the difficult challenges facing her during the Great Recession, when the bottom dropped out of the auto industry in her state,” said Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinRomney blasts end of filibuster, expansion of SCOTUS Five takeaways from Biden's first budget proposal Parkland parent pressures Manchin on gun reform: 'You represent the nation' MORE (D-W.Va.). “She helped save the domestic auto industry; she diversified Michigan’s economy; she brought in new investment in new industry and she created new jobs, leaving no worker behind.”

“She has the leadership skills, the vision and the compassion ... to face the climate challenge and at the same time preserve our energy security, protect our national security, clean up the Cold War legacy and preserve our scientific and technological prowess,” he added in a floor speech ahead of the vote.

After her confirmation, Granholm tweeted: "I’m obsessed with creating good-paying clean energy jobs in all corners of America in service of addressing our climate crisis. I’m impatient for results. Now let’s get to work!"

Some Republicans remain skeptical of her and have raised concerns on the impact of the Biden administration's agenda on the fossil fuel industry.

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“President Biden has declared war on American energy and American energy workers,” Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoSunday shows preview: Democrats eye passage of infrastructure bill; health experts warn of fourth coronavirus wave Lack of cyber funds in Biden infrastructure plan raises eyebrows As Congress considers infrastructure, don't forget rural America MORE (R-Wyo.) said on the Senate floor. "I cannot in good conscience vote to approve his nominee for secretary of Energy."

Both Biden and Granholm have stressed they want the transition toward clean energy to create new jobs in various sectors of the economy.

The agency Granholm is set to manage has a broad portfolio that includes the country’s nuclear weapons stockpile. During her January hearing, Granholm said her priorities would be ensuring U.S. national security and supporting scientific work at national labs that extends to work on climate change.

Pressed by Republicans on fossil fuels, Granholm said it is a “good thing” that the U.S. is the world’s largest oil and natural gas producer, and expressed support for still-developing carbon capture and storage technology to produce those fuels in a cleaner manner.

In announcing Granholm as his nominee, Biden touted her record on clean energy and jobs during her time as Michigan’s governor. 

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“Throughout her career, she’s worked with states, cities, business and labor to promote [a] clean energy future,” Biden said in December.

The Senate has been working to confirm Biden's nominees, though many have not yet received a vote.

Officials who have been confirmed include Veteran Affairs Secretary Denis McDonoughDenis Richard McDonoughCongress must address the toxic exposure our veterans have endured Veterans shouldn't have to wait for quality care The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality MORE, Transportation Secretary Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegButtigieg hopes cruises will return by mid-summer Biden to host bipartisan talks on infrastructure next week The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - World mourns the death of Prince Philip MORE, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro MayorkasAlejandro Mayorkas3M files lawsuit against Florida company over fake N95 masks Omar slams Biden admin for continuing 'the construction of Trump's xenophobic and racist wall' Biden review could reveal additional families separated under Trump 'zero tolerance' policy MORE, Director of National Intelligence Avril HainesAvril HainesHillicon Valley: Intel heads to resume threats hearing scrapped under Trump | New small business coalition to urge action on antitrust policy | Amazon backs corporate tax hike to pay for infrastructure Intel heads to resume worldwide threats hearing scrapped under Trump 2024 GOP White House hopefuls lead opposition to Biden Cabinet MORE, Defense Secretary Lloyd AustinLloyd AustinOvernight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists The paradox of US-India relations Pentagon chief to visit Europe, Israel amid tensions with Russia, Iran MORE, Treasury Secretary Janet YellenJanet Louise YellenFive takeaways from Biden's first budget proposal Biden defense budget criticized by Republicans, progressives alike Biden proposes .2B increase in IRS budget MORE, Secretary of State Antony BlinkenAntony BlinkenGOP lawmakers block Biden assistance to Palestinians Biden loves the Georgia boycott — So why won't he boycott the Beijing Olympic games? The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings MORE and Agriculture Secretary Tom VilsackTom VilsackUSDA: Farm-to-school programs help schools serve healthier meals OVERNIGHT MONEY: House poised to pass debt-ceiling bill MORE.

Updated at 1:57 p.m.