Senate confirms former Michigan governor Granholm as Energy secretary

The Senate on Thursday confirmed Jennifer GranholmJennifer GranholmBiden: A good coach knows when to change up the team Overnight Energy & Environment — Biden announces green buildings initiative Overnight Energy & Environment — Earth records its hottest years ever MORE to lead the Energy Department, making her the latest Cabinet nominee to secure confirmation this week.

She was confirmed in a 64-35 vote, with 14 Republicans joining all 50 Senate Democrats in supporting her nomination.

Granholm, who served as governor of Michigan from 2003-2011, will be tasked with helping President BidenJoe BidenNorth Korea conducts potential 6th missile test in a month Clyburn predicts Supreme Court contender J. Michelle Childs would get GOP votes Overnight Defense & National Security — US delivers written response to Russia MORE transition the U.S. toward clean energy as part of his goal to put the country on a path toward carbon neutrality by 2050.

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Her supporters have praised the work she did on jobs and clean energy in Michigan.

“I saw how she handled the difficult challenges facing her during the Great Recession, when the bottom dropped out of the auto industry in her state,” said Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinOn The Money — No SALT, and maybe no deal The names to know as Biden mulls Breyer's replacement Poll: Sinema approval higher among Arizona Republicans than Democrats MORE (D-W.Va.). “She helped save the domestic auto industry; she diversified Michigan’s economy; she brought in new investment in new industry and she created new jobs, leaving no worker behind.”

“She has the leadership skills, the vision and the compassion ... to face the climate challenge and at the same time preserve our energy security, protect our national security, clean up the Cold War legacy and preserve our scientific and technological prowess,” he added in a floor speech ahead of the vote.

After her confirmation, Granholm tweeted: "I’m obsessed with creating good-paying clean energy jobs in all corners of America in service of addressing our climate crisis. I’m impatient for results. Now let’s get to work!"

Some Republicans remain skeptical of her and have raised concerns on the impact of the Biden administration's agenda on the fossil fuel industry.

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“President Biden has declared war on American energy and American energy workers,” Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoWatch: GOP leaders discuss Biden's first year in office McConnell will run for another term as leader despite Trump's attacks Senate Minority Whip Thune, close McConnell ally, to run for reelection MORE (R-Wyo.) said on the Senate floor. "I cannot in good conscience vote to approve his nominee for secretary of Energy."

Both Biden and Granholm have stressed they want the transition toward clean energy to create new jobs in various sectors of the economy.

The agency Granholm is set to manage has a broad portfolio that includes the country’s nuclear weapons stockpile. During her January hearing, Granholm said her priorities would be ensuring U.S. national security and supporting scientific work at national labs that extends to work on climate change.

Pressed by Republicans on fossil fuels, Granholm said it is a “good thing” that the U.S. is the world’s largest oil and natural gas producer, and expressed support for still-developing carbon capture and storage technology to produce those fuels in a cleaner manner.

In announcing Granholm as his nominee, Biden touted her record on clean energy and jobs during her time as Michigan’s governor. 

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“Throughout her career, she’s worked with states, cities, business and labor to promote [a] clean energy future,” Biden said in December.

The Senate has been working to confirm Biden's nominees, though many have not yet received a vote.

Officials who have been confirmed include Veteran Affairs Secretary Denis McDonoughDenis Richard McDonoughWe have a golden opportunity to restore and reform VA hospitals The Hill's Morning Report - Biden to make voting rights play in Atlanta Schwarzenegger donates 25 tiny homes to homeless vets in LA MORE, Transportation Secretary Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden talks, Senate balks Airlines suspend US flights in response to 5G deployment AT&T, Verizon to delay 5G rollout near certain airports MORE, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro MayorkasAlejandro MayorkasSenate Republicans press federal authorities for information on Texas synagogue hostage-taker Hillicon Valley — Biden celebrates 'right to repair' wins DHS warns electrical infrastructure an 'attractive target' for domestic extremists MORE, Director of National Intelligence Avril HainesAvril HainesVirtual realities may solve Fermi's paradox about extraterrestrials Federal judge dismisses lawsuit against former top Saudi intel official Overnight Defense & National Security — Russian military moves cause for concern MORE, Defense Secretary Lloyd AustinLloyd AustinBiden's first year: A mirage of gender parity Defense & National Security — Pentagon puts 8,500 troops on high alert Pentagon puts 8,500 troops on higher alert over Russia-Ukraine tensions MORE, Treasury Secretary Janet YellenJanet YellenYellen says Biden's COVID-19 relief bill 'acted like a vaccine for the American economy' On the Money — Yellen highlights wealth gap in MLK speech Yellen: US has 'much more work' to close racial wealth gap MORE, Secretary of State Antony BlinkenAntony BlinkenNorth Korea conducts potential 6th missile test in a month Russia-Ukraine talks yield agreement to meet again in two weeks Overnight Defense & National Security — US delivers written response to Russia MORE and Agriculture Secretary Tom VilsackTom VilsackUSDA: Farm-to-school programs help schools serve healthier meals OVERNIGHT MONEY: House poised to pass debt-ceiling bill MORE.

Updated at 1:57 p.m.