Senate confirms former Michigan governor Granholm as Energy secretary

The Senate on Thursday confirmed Jennifer GranholmJennifer GranholmEnergy Department to seek feedback on voluntary nuclear waste facilities The massive messaging miscues of all the president's men (and women) White House looks to rein in gas prices ahead of busy travel season MORE to lead the Energy Department, making her the latest Cabinet nominee to secure confirmation this week.

She was confirmed in a 64-35 vote, with 14 Republicans joining all 50 Senate Democrats in supporting her nomination.

Granholm, who served as governor of Michigan from 2003-2011, will be tasked with helping President BidenJoe BidenMarcus Garvey's descendants call for Biden to pardon civil rights leader posthumously GOP grapples with chaotic Senate primary in Pennsylvania ​​Trump social media startup receives commitment of billion from unidentified 'diverse group' of investors MORE transition the U.S. toward clean energy as part of his goal to put the country on a path toward carbon neutrality by 2050.

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Her supporters have praised the work she did on jobs and clean energy in Michigan.

“I saw how she handled the difficult challenges facing her during the Great Recession, when the bottom dropped out of the auto industry in her state,” said Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinIRS data proves Trump tax cuts benefited middle, working-class Americans most Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by ExxonMobil — Dems press drillers over methane leaks Overnight Health Care — Presented by March of Dimes — Abortion access for 65M women at stake MORE (D-W.Va.). “She helped save the domestic auto industry; she diversified Michigan’s economy; she brought in new investment in new industry and she created new jobs, leaving no worker behind.”

“She has the leadership skills, the vision and the compassion ... to face the climate challenge and at the same time preserve our energy security, protect our national security, clean up the Cold War legacy and preserve our scientific and technological prowess,” he added in a floor speech ahead of the vote.

After her confirmation, Granholm tweeted: "I’m obsessed with creating good-paying clean energy jobs in all corners of America in service of addressing our climate crisis. I’m impatient for results. Now let’s get to work!"

Some Republicans remain skeptical of her and have raised concerns on the impact of the Biden administration's agenda on the fossil fuel industry.

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“President Biden has declared war on American energy and American energy workers,” Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoCongress averts shutdown after vaccine mandate fight Sunday shows - Spotlight shifts to omicron variant Barrasso calls Biden's agenda 'Alice in Wonderland' logic: 'He's the Mad Hatter' MORE (R-Wyo.) said on the Senate floor. "I cannot in good conscience vote to approve his nominee for secretary of Energy."

Both Biden and Granholm have stressed they want the transition toward clean energy to create new jobs in various sectors of the economy.

The agency Granholm is set to manage has a broad portfolio that includes the country’s nuclear weapons stockpile. During her January hearing, Granholm said her priorities would be ensuring U.S. national security and supporting scientific work at national labs that extends to work on climate change.

Pressed by Republicans on fossil fuels, Granholm said it is a “good thing” that the U.S. is the world’s largest oil and natural gas producer, and expressed support for still-developing carbon capture and storage technology to produce those fuels in a cleaner manner.

In announcing Granholm as his nominee, Biden touted her record on clean energy and jobs during her time as Michigan’s governor. 

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“Throughout her career, she’s worked with states, cities, business and labor to promote [a] clean energy future,” Biden said in December.

The Senate has been working to confirm Biden's nominees, though many have not yet received a vote.

Officials who have been confirmed include Veteran Affairs Secretary Denis McDonoughDenis Richard McDonoughOvernight Defense & National Security — Austin mandates vaccine for Guardsmen The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden favors vaccines, masks over lockdowns as omicron nears Biden signs four bills aimed at helping veterans MORE, Transportation Secretary Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Congress avoids shutdown Harris's office undergoes difficult reset The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden to announce increased measures for omicron MORE, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro MayorkasAlejandro MayorkasHillicon Valley —TSA to strengthen rail sector cybersecurity TSA issues directives to rail sector to strengthen cybersecurity US to restart 'Remain in Mexico' program following court order MORE, Director of National Intelligence Avril HainesAvril HainesOvernight Defense & National Security — Russian military moves cause for concern New Pentagon group to investigate unidentified aerial phenomena This Thanksgiving, skip the political food fights and talk UFOs instead MORE, Defense Secretary Lloyd AustinLloyd AustinBiden administration prepared to use 'other tools' on Iran amid troubled nuclear talks Photos of the Week: Schumer, ASU protest and sea turtles Overnight Defense & National Security — US tries to deter Russian invasion of Ukraine MORE, Treasury Secretary Janet YellenJanet Louise YellenTreasury refrains from naming any currency manipulators US could default within weeks absent action on debt limit: analysis The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Congress avoids shutdown MORE, Secretary of State Antony BlinkenAntony BlinkenBiden administration prepared to use 'other tools' on Iran amid troubled nuclear talks US intelligence says Russia planning Ukraine offensive involving 175K troops: reports Blinken: A move by China to invade Taiwan would have 'terrible consequences' MORE and Agriculture Secretary Tom VilsackTom VilsackUSDA: Farm-to-school programs help schools serve healthier meals OVERNIGHT MONEY: House poised to pass debt-ceiling bill MORE.

Updated at 1:57 p.m.