Sanders says there may be 'give and take' on reconciliation price tag

Sanders says there may be 'give and take' on reconciliation price tag
© Greg Nash

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersStudy: Test detects signs of dementia at least six months earlier than standard method The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Omicron tests vaccines; Bob Dole dies at 98 Democrats see Christmas goal slipping away MORE (I-Vt.) acknowledged on Sunday that there may have to be some “give and take” on lowering the price tag for a reconciliation bill.

Sanders told ABC’s “This Week” co-anchor Jonathan Karl that he knows he's not going to get the full amount he wants to address the social spending priorities that progressives are aiming for.

“What the president has said is that there's going to have to be some give and take, and I think that that's right. I think if anything, Jonathan, when we especially talk about the crisis of climate change and the need to transform our energy system away from fossil fuel, the $6 trillion that I originally proposed was probably too little,” Sanders told Karl on Sunday. “Three and a half trillion should be a minimum, but I accept that there's gonna have to be give and take.”

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Moderates and progressives came to a deadlock this week as attempts to bring a vote on the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill failed. House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDole in final column: 'Too many of us have sacrificed too much' Dole to lie in state in Capitol Rotunda House to vote on Uyghur bill amid diplomatic boycott of Beijing Olympics MORE (D-Calif.) had aimed to have the House hold a vote on the bipartisan bill on Thursday, however progressives threatened to tank the bill unless the reconciliation package was passed first.

The bipartisan infrastructure bill has been languishing in the House since the Senate passed the bill in a 69-30 vote in August. 

However, Sens. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinSchumer steps on the gas to move Biden agenda Overnight Health Care — Biden touts drug price push Biden points to drug prices in call for Senate social spending vote MORE (D-W.Va.) and Kyrsten SinemaKyrsten SinemaBiden points to drug prices in call for Senate social spending vote The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Omicron tests vaccines; Bob Dole dies at 98 This week: Congress poised to go into December overtime MORE (D-Ariz.) held up the bill over its $3.5 trillion topline price tag. Manchin revealed this week that he would support a $1.5 trillion price tag instead, well below what moderates are looking for.

Plans to vote on the bipartisan infrastructure bill were punted again on Friday as President BidenJoe BidenMan sentenced to nearly four years for running scam Trump, Biden PACs Dole in final column: 'Too many of us have sacrificed too much' Meadows says Trump's blood oxygen level was dangerously low when he had COVID-19 MORE broke the news that a vote on the legislation would not take place in the House. According to two lawmakers in the room, Biden threw out a range that congressional Democrats could seek instead - between $1.9 trillion to $2.3 trillion.