12 top U.S. officials to join Biden at major climate conference

12 top U.S. officials to join Biden at major climate conference
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The Biden administration will send a host of Cabinet and other top officials to the international climate conference in Glasgow next month, in addition to the president himself, a White House official confirmed to The Hill. 

Joining President BidenJoe BidenHow 'Buy American', other pro-US policies can help advocates pass ambitious climate policies Overnight Defense & National Security — Presented by Raytheon Technologies — Biden backtracks on Taiwan Photos of the Week: Manchin protestor, Paris Hilton and a mirror room MORE will be two top climate aides and officials: special climate envoy John KerryJohn KerryQueen Elizabeth resting 'for a few days' after hospital stay Twenty-four countries say global net-zero goal will fuel inequality Queen Elizabeth recognizes Kerry from video message: 'I saw you on the telly' MORE and national climate adviser Gina McCarthyGina McCarthyOvernight Energy & Environment — Presented by ExxonMobil — Biden administration breaks down climate finance roadmap Obama to attend Glasgow climate summit White House puts together climate finance strategy MORE

In addition, they’ll be joined by Secretary of State Antony BlinkenAntony BlinkenOvernight Defense & National Security — Presented by Raytheon Technologies — Biden backtracks on Taiwan Nearly 200 Americans want to leave Afghanistan, State Department tells Congress Syria's challenge to Tony Blinken's conscience MORE, Treasury Secretary Janet YellenJanet Louise YellenUS deficit hits .8 trillion, second largest in history Financial oversight panel unveils climate risk plan On The Money — Democrats eye tough choices as deadline looms MORE, Interior Secretary Deb HaalandDeb HaalandBiden taps Obama-era official to lead Fish and Wildlife Service The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Manchin, Sanders in budget feud; Biden still upbeat Cheney reveals GOP's Banks claimed he was Jan. 6 panel's ranking member MORE, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Michael ReganMichael ReganDoes the UN climate summit matter? 5 reasons why it does Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by the American Petroleum Institute — Democrats address reports that clean energy program will be axed Democratic appropriations bills would increase environmental funding by B MORE, Energy Secretary Jennifer GranholmJennifer GranholmOvernight Energy & Environment — Presented by ExxonMobil — Biden administration breaks down climate finance roadmap Regulators can no longer rubber-stamp expansion of the oil and gas industry Obama to attend Glasgow climate summit MORE, Transportation Secretary Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden's Big Labor policies will create next round of inflation Airlines should give flight attendants 10 hours of rest between flights: FAA GOP memo urges lawmakers to blame White House 'grinches' for Christmas delays MORE, Agriculture Secretary Tom VilsackTom VilsackUSDA: Farm-to-school programs help schools serve healthier meals OVERNIGHT MONEY: House poised to pass debt-ceiling bill MORE, U.S. Agency for International Development Administrator Samantha PowerSamantha Power White House: US has donated 200 million COVID-19 vaccines around the world Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by ExxonMobil — Climate divides conservative Democrats in reconciliation push 12 top U.S. officials to join Biden at major climate conference MORE, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Administrator Rick Spinrad and White House Office of Science and Technology policy director Eric LanderEric LanderThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Democrats optimistic after Biden meetings Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by ExxonMobil — Climate divides conservative Democrats in reconciliation push 12 top U.S. officials to join Biden at major climate conference MORE.

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The attendees were first reported by CNN, which obtained a schedule, and were confirmed to The Hill by a White House official. 

At the Glasgow conference, known as COP26, countries are expected to negotiate the future of climate action. 

Biden has sought to demonstrate U.S. leadership on the issue, announcing in April that the U.S. would aim to cut its greenhouse gas emissions at least in half by 2030 when compared to 2005 levels.

But there are questions about whether the U.S. can live up to its commitments, especially as the White House and Congress struggle to get a spending package — which has major investments to tackle climate change — across the finish line.