Senators split on health care's effect on climate bill

He recently said use of budget reconciliation to complete the health plan will “poison the well” for subsequent bills, because Republicans are so angry about Democratic tactics (see posts here and here on this).



But Sen. Robert CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyDoes anyone care about professional caregivers? Experts sound alarm over online scams against the elderly The Hill's Morning Report - Sanders takes incoming during intense SC debate MORE (D-Pa.) tells The Hill Thursday that the health care victory bodes well for the climate and energy effort. “I think it does [help] because it shows that even in this environment, we can get something substantial done, a big bill, a big public policy initiative,” he said.

By “this environment,” Casey says he means the combination of factors including partisanship, procedural challenges to many bills, the sour economy, and the looming mid-term elections.

“I don’t underestimate that it is going to be a challenge, but if you had to make a judgment call, nest positive-net negative, I’d say it is net positive,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT
Graham is working on a broad climate and energy bill with Sens. John KerryJohn Forbes KerryDemocratic insiders stay on the sidelines in 2020 race 70 former senators propose bipartisan caucus for incumbents John Kerry: Democratic debate 'was something of a food fight' MORE (D-Mass.) and Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.).

Maybe the passage of health care legislation – the most sweeping Democratic social policy bill in decades – doesn’t affect the landscape on climate all that much at all.

At least that’s the view of Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharWatch live: Trump holds a rally in South Carolina Biden, Klobuchar to address AIPAC via video Overnight Energy: Trump sued over Pentagon funds for border wall | Lawsuit warns wall will have 'devastating' effect on environment | Judge voids oil, gas leases on 1M acres of public lands MORE (D-Minn.).

“I think it is one thing at a time here,” she tells The Hill. “I think that the success of an energy bill will depend on how the new effort by Graham and Kerry and Lieberman is received.”

“I think it is independent of health care,” she continued. “The energy bill by its nature will have to have at least some bipartisan support.” She didn’t say more, but positions on energy policy break to some extent along regional lines, not just party loyalty.