Overnight Energy: Proposed rule would roll back endangered species protections | House passes Interior, EPA spending | House votes to disavow carbon tax

Overnight Energy: Proposed rule would roll back endangered species protections | House passes Interior, EPA spending | House votes to disavow carbon tax
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INTERIOR RULE WOULD ROLLBACK ENDANGERED SPECIES PROTECTIONS: The Trump administration is proposing significant changes to the way it enforces the Endangered Species Act (ESA), saying they are a needed modernization of decades-old regulations, but wildlife groups say the changes will put endangered animals and plants at risk.

The proposal would make it easier to delist an endangered species and would withdraw a policy that offered the same protections for threatened species as for endangered species unless otherwise specified.

It would streamline interagency consultations and make it more difficult to protect habitat near land where endangered species live.

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The proposed rules also include an interpretation that a species considered endangered would be protected for a "foreseeable future" that extends "only as far" as it can be reasonably determined that "both the future threats and the species' responses to those threats are probable."

In a call with stakeholders on Thursday, Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Deputy Director Greg Sheehan called the proposal a way of "providing clarity."

He said the changes would help the agency meet the Endangered Species Act's main goal of "species recovery" so that animals and plants could more easily be removed from endangered and threatened species lists.

The move to change the act reflects demands from industry groups and landowners who frequently challenge endangered species protections as overbearing and unsuccessful. Critics of the law have argued that only 3 percent of all species placed on the endangered list have ever been delisted.

Read more here.

And if you want to read more about other Endangered Species Act rollbacks...

 

Happy Thursday! Welcome to Overnight Energy, The Hill's roundup of the latest energy and environment news.

Please send tips and comments to Timothy Cama, tcama@thehill.com, and Miranda Green, mgreen@thehill.com. Follow us on Twitter: @Timothy_Cama, @mirandacgreen, @thehill.

 

HOUSE PASSES 'MINIBUS' APPROPRIATIONS BILL: The House on Thursday passed a package of two 2019 appropriations bills, marking the halfway point in its quest to pass the 12 annual spending bills needed to fund the government.

Totaling $58.7 billion, the Financial Services bill and the Interior and Environment bills fund agencies including the IRS and various financial regulators, as well as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Interior Department and a series of popular arts programs.

The bill passed mostly along party lines, in a vote of 217-199.

Fifteen Republicans joined every Democrat in voting against the measure, including several conservatives protesting the spending levels.

"These bills fund vital programs across the federal government, including those that make Americans safer, protect our nation's resources, and create jobs," Appropriations Committee Chairman Rodney FrelinghuysenRodney Procter FrelinghuysenThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Top House GOP appropriations staffer moves to lobbying shop Individuals with significant disabilities need hope and action MORE (R-N.J.) said on the House floor.

The full Senate has not yet passed its versions of the bills but is expected to take them up next week, potentially alongside spending bills covering Agriculture and Transportation, Housing and Urban Development.

The two chambers have until Oct. 1 to pass all 12 appropriations bills, iron out the differences and send them to the president's desk for signature.

Why this is noteworthy: It's a feat Congress has been unable to accomplish on time in over two decades.

Read more here.

 

HOUSE VOTES TO DISAVOW CARBON TAX: The House passed a nonbinding measure Thursday to denounce a carbon tax, calling it "detrimental" to the United States.

The resolution, sponsored by House Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseTrump encouraged Scalise to run for governor in Louisiana: report We owe a debt of gratitude to all our police officers and their families House votes to extend flood insurance program MORE (R-La.), states that a tax on emissions of carbon dioxide -- the most prevalent greenhouse gas that causes climate change -- "would be detrimental to American families and businesses, and is not in the best interest of the United States."

It passed 229-180 with two members voting "present."

Six Republicans voted against the resolution: Reps. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloDisinvited GOP lawmaker turns up at Dem hearing Overnight Energy: 2020 rivals rip Biden over expected 'middle ground' climate plan | Dems cancel plans to invite Republican to testify on climate change | House passes .2B disaster aid bill over Trump objections Dems cancel plans to bring in Republican as climate change witness MORE (Fla.), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickHere are the eight Republicans who voted with Democrats on the Equality Act House approves anti-LGBT discrimination Equality Act This week: House to vote on bill to ban LGBTQ discrimination MORE (Pa.), Trey HollingsworthJoseph (Trey) Albert HollingsworthNew bill would restrict Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac from lobbying The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition — Trump rallies for second term on 'promises kept' Overnight Defense: House votes to condemn transgender military ban | 5 Republicans vote against ban | Senate bill would block Turkey getting F-35s over Russia deal MORE (Ind.), Mia LoveLudmya (Mia) LoveCongressional Women's Softball team releases roster The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Juan Williams: Racial shifts spark fury in Trump and his base MORE (Utah), Francis RooneyLaurence (Francis) Francis RooneyOvernight Energy: Bipartisan climate caucus eyes litmus test for new members| Green groups want freeze on Keystone construction| Bernhardt sworn in as Secretary of Interior Overnight Energy: Bipartisan climate caucus eyes litmus test for new members | Greens want freeze on Keystone construction | Bernhardt sworn in as Interior chief Bipartisan climate caucus eyes litmus test for new members MORE (Fla.) and Ileana Ros-LehtinenIleana Carmen Ros-LehtinenEx-GOP Rep. Denham heads to lobbying firm K Street boom extends under Trump, House Dems Bottom Line MORE (Fla.).

Seven Democrats broke with their caucus to vote "yes": Reps. Sanford Bishop (Ga.), Henry Cuellar (Texas), Vicente González (Texas), Conor Lamb (Pa.), Stephanie MurphyStephanie MurphyHillicon Valley: Trump takes flak for not joining anti-extremism pact | Phone carriers largely end sharing of location data | Huawei pushes back on ban | Florida lawmakers demand to learn counties hacked by Russians | Feds bust 0M cybercrime group Florida lawmakers push FBI, DHS to declassify names of the two counties hacked by Russia in 2016 Florida governor says Russia hacked two counties in 2016 MORE (Fla.), Tom O'Halleran (Ariz.) and Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.), who is running for the Senate.

Two lawmakers voted "present," indicating neither support nor opposition: Reps. Ryan CostelloRyan Anthony CostellloOvernight Energy: Park Service closing Joshua Tree after shutdown damage | Dems deliver trash from parks to White House | Dems offer bills to block offshore drilling | Oil lobby worries about Trump trade fight Ex-GOP Rep. Ryan Costello joins group pushing carbon tax Exiting lawmakers jockey for K Street perch MORE (R-Pa.) and Michelle Lujan GrishamMichelle Lynn Lujan GrishamTrump jokes after rallygoer suggests migrants be shot Conserving wildlife migrations is part science, part policy Republicans target voter registration drives with new state laws MORE (D-N.M.).

The risk of lawmakers passing a carbon tax is low, considering widespread GOP opposition and Republican control of both chambers of Congress and the White House.

But Republicans nonetheless felt it was important to make a statement to denounce the possibility.

"This resolution will send a clear signal to the American people that we oppose policies that would drive up energy prices for families and for businesses," Rep. Kenny MarchantKenny Ewell MarchantDCCC opens Texas office to protect House pickups, target vulnerable GOP seats Treasury expands penalty relief to more taxpayers Dems press Mnuchin on Trump tax returns MORE (R-Texas) said Thursday on the House floor.

"A stand-alone carbon tax, generally, would have such detrimental effects on the economy and would be an unwarranted and transparent grab for revenue," he said.

Read more here.

And stay tuned for a bill from GOP Rep. Curbello Monday that would introduce a carbon tax...

 

OUTSIDE THE BELTWAY:

Saudi Aramco is looking to buy a stake in SABIC, the Saudi Arabian chemical company, Reuters reports.

Sediment levels in the Mississippi River are dropping, which could be bad for the Louisiana coast, the Times-Picayune reports.

British Prime Minister Theresa May is introducing a bill to set out a new 25-year plan for the environment, BBC News reports.

 

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT:

Check out stories from Thursday...

-Defense Department walks back opposition to sage grouse amendment

-US crude oil production hit record level in June

-EPA watchdog faults 'management weaknesses' in Flint water crisis

-Elon Musk asked Sierra Club to publicize his donations to stem criticism: report

-Trump administration introduces proposal to roll back Endangered Species Act protections

-House completes first half of 2019 spending bills

-House votes to disavow carbon tax