Overnight Energy — Presented by Job Creators Network — Dems want Trump to tackle climate change in infrastructure deal | O'Rourke rolls out $5 trillion climate plan | Why some greens think O'Rourke's plan falls short

Overnight Energy — Presented by Job Creators Network — Dems want Trump to tackle climate change in infrastructure deal | O'Rourke rolls out $5 trillion climate plan | Why some greens think O'Rourke's plan falls short
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RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE: The top two Democratic leaders on Monday told President TrumpDonald John TrumpPompeo changes staff for Russia meeting after concerns raised about top negotiator's ties: report House unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Ben Carson: Trump is not a racist and his comments were not racist MORE that any bipartisan infrastructure package needs to take into consideration climate change and include "substantial, new and real revenue" -- a preview of the coming fight over tax hikes.

Trump will host Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiHouse unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Will Trump's racist tweets backfire? Al Green: 'We have the opportunity to punish' Trump with impeachment vote MORE (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerLawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens Trump administration denies temporary immigrant status to Venezuelans in US Colombian official urges more help for Venezuelan migrants MORE (D-N.Y.) at the White House on Tuesday for discussions on a major infrastructure bill, one of the few policy areas that could see action amid divided government and as the 2020 race heats up.

Democrats want the measure for roads, bridges, waterways and other projects to be paid for with tax increases, and with a final price tag of at least $1 trillion over 10 years. Trump's fiscal 2020 budget calls for $200 billion in federal spending on infrastructure, which White House officials say will leverage an additional $800 billion in investment through public-private partnerships over the next decade.

"America's unmet infrastructure needs are massive, and a bipartisan infrastructure package must meet those needs with substantial, new and real revenue," Pelosi and Schumer wrote in a letter to Trump on Monday. "We look forward to hearing your ideas on how to pay for this package to ensure that it is big and bold enough to meet our country's needs."

 

Dems say climate change is changing America's infrastructure needs...

The leaders laid out other Democratic priorities: Any deal must extend beyond traditional infrastructure projects, take into account climate change, include "Buy America" provisions and provide jobs for a broad swath of workers.

"A big and bold infrastructure package must be comprehensive and include clean energy and resiliency priorities," Pelosi and Schumer wrote. "To truly be a gamechanger for the American people, we should go beyond transportation and into broadband, water, energy, schools, housing and other initiatives. We must also invest in resiliency and risk mitigation of our current infrastructure to deal with climate change."

Read more here.

 

 

 

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O'ROURKE UNVEILS CLIMATE PLAN: Former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump digs in ahead of House vote to condemn tweet Poll: Biden, Sanders and Warren lead 2020 Democrats in New Hampshire Poll: Biden leads 2020 Democrats by 13 points, followed by Sanders, Warren and Harris MORE (D-Texas) on Monday rolled out his most ambitious policy proposal to date, calling for the United States to invest $5 trillion over the next decade in an effort to cut the country's greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050.

O'Rourke aims to update aging U.S. infrastructure, accelerate innovation and invest climate sustainability in local communities. His campaign said it would be the "largest investment in fighting climate change in history."

The climate proposal also includes executive actions that O'Rourke's campaign said he would sign on day one if elected. Under his plan, the U.S. would reenter the Paris climate agreement and there would be a moratorium on new oil and gas sales on federal lands and offshore, while setting a 2030 net-zero emissions target for federal lands. Emissions from drilling on public lands currently account for roughly a quarter of all U.S. emissions.

"The greatest threat we face -- which will test our country, our democracy, every single one of us -- is climate change," O'Rourke said in a statement.

"We have one last chance to unleash the ingenuity and political will of hundreds of millions of Americans to meet this moment before it's too late," he added. "The actions we're announcing today will help us get there -- by wasting no time cutting pollution, making historic investments in infrastructure, innovation, and our communities, setting bold emissions targets, and defending those most at risk from the dangers and destruction of climate change."

 

Competing 2020 plans...

The plan marks O'Rourke's first major policy rollout since announcing his presidential bid last month. The move is likely aimed at blunting criticism that the former congressman lacks a signature policy issue.

The rollout comes just days after fellow 2020 candidate Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Hill's Morning Report - A raucous debate on race ends with Trump admonishment Lawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens Schumer throws support behind bill to study reparations MORE (D-N.J.) unveiled his environmental justice plan. Another White House hopeful, Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeNew Trump rules prompt Planned Parenthood to forgo federal funds The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump digs in ahead of House vote to condemn tweet Oregon to require schools to teach about Holocaust MORE (D), has made climate change the centerpiece of his campaign.

Almost every Democrat who has joined the presidential race has made fighting global warming a key part of their platform. O'Rourke is among those who have signed on to the tenets of the progressive Green New Deal, which aims to get the U.S. electric grid running on renewable energy by shifting the economy toward green jobs.

 

But not everyone thinks Beto's plan is aggressive enough…

A major group behind the Green New Deal on Monday attacked a campaign climate proposal from former Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-Texas), arguing the plan isn't aggressive enough when it comes to certain timelines and goals.

The Sunrise Movement, a youth climate organization that backs the Green New Deal, points to scientists who argue the U.S. must act by 2030.

"We're glad to see Beto release a climate plan as his first policy and commit to making it a day one priority for his administration. He gets a lot right in this plan," Varshini Prakash, executive director of the group, said in a statement.

"Unfortunately, Beto gets the science wrong and walks back his commitments from earlier this month in Iowa to move to net-zero emissions by 2030. Beto claims to support the Green New Deal, but his plan is out of line with the timeline it lays out and the scale of action that scientists say is necessary to take here in the United States to give our generation a livable future."

 

The group's climate timeline is stroking controversy...

Sunrise wants every 2020 candidate to commit to a 2030 timeline.

While there is agreement among climate scientists that swift action is needed to ease the ramifications of global warming, the timeline proposed in the Green New Deal, along with the heavy reliance on renewables, has divided Democrats.

O'Rourke's plan calls for getting halfway toward net-zero emissions by 2030, with the former lawmaker saying he would work with Congress within his first 100 days in office to set legally enforceable standards for reducing emissions. He said he also would end leases for fossil fuel production on federal lands and recommit the U.S. to the Paris climate accord.

Aliya Haq, a senior climate adviser to the Natural Resources Defense Council Action Fund, said while O'Rourke's timelines could be more aggressive, his plan hit several key components needed to address global warming.

"Sunrise is right that we need to make very serious progress by 2030. We need to see aggressive emissions cuts in the next 10 years without a doubt," she said. "I think [O'Rourke] is hitting all the key themes we need to see in a full climate platform, which is long-term emission goals as well as need for investment and the need to start acting Day One of a new presidency. And a recognition it's not just about cutting carbon pollution but getting communities ready for the impacts of climate change."

Read more on O'Rourke's plan here and here.

 

ON TAP TOMORROW:

House committees on Tuesday will explore the clean energy future of public lands, the impacts of a proposed Department of Interior reorganization plan and the proposed 2020 budget for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Tuesday will also be a big day for climate hearings in the House. The House Select Committee on Climate Crisis will hold its second hearing this year on "Drawing Down Carbon and Building Up the American Economy."  The Science, Space, and Technology's Subcommittee on Research and Technology will hold a hearing on new plastic recycling technology and the Committee on Oversight and Reform's new subcommittee on environment will hold its second hearing on the health effects of global warming.

 

OUTSIDE THE BELTWAY:

Pennsylvania joins climate coalition and releases carbon-cutting plan, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports.

Los Angeles unveils plan aiming for all emission-free vehicles by 2050.

Washington passes bill to become first state to compost human bodies, The Washington Post reports.

L.A. firefighters were distracted by politicians during a recent wildfire, the Los Angeles Times reports.

 

ICYMI:

Stories from today and over the weekend...

California restaurants add optional 1 percent surcharge to help combat climate change

Ex-Trump Cabinet heads' lobbying gigs challenge 'drain the swamp' message

Australia wants to kill millions of feral cats by airdropping poisonous sausages

London Marathon replacing thousands of plastic water bottles with biodegradable seaweed pouches

O'Rourke rolls out $5 trillion climate change plan

Group backing Green New Deal blasts O'Rourke's climate plan

Los Angeles unveils plan aiming for all emission-free vehicles by 2050

Dems want climate change, tax hikes in infrastructure deal