OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden suspends Arctic oil leases issued under Trump |  Experts warn US needs to better prepare for hurricane season | Progressives set sights on Civilian Climate Corps

OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden suspends Arctic oil leases issued under Trump |  Experts warn US needs to better prepare for hurricane season | Progressives set sights on Civilian Climate Corps
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Today we’re looking at the suspension of ANWR leases, preparedness for hurricane season (or lack thereof) and the Sunrise Movement’s focus on the Civilian Climate Corps

ANWR WAR CONTINUES: Biden administration suspends Arctic oil leases issued under Trump

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 The Biden administration will suspend controversial leases issued under the previous administration for drilling at the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), it announced Tuesday.

The leases will be halted amid a further environmental review, which will determine whether they should be reaffirmed, voided or subject to additional measures to lessen their environmental impacts, according to an Interior Department statement. 

An order signed on Tuesday by Interior Secretary Deb HaalandDeb HaalandTracy Stone-Manning's confirmation treatment was simply unacceptable — and it must stop Overnight Energy: Haaland, Native American leaders press for Indigenous land protections | Biden to return to pre-Obama water protections | Western governors ask Biden for aid on wildfires Haaland, Native American leaders press for Indigenous land protections MORE said that a departmental review found "multiple legal deficiencies" in the record supporting the leases. 

These included insufficient environmental analysis including "failure to adequately analyze a reasonable range of alternatives" in a prior environmental review and a failure to properly interpret the law authorizing the lease sales. 

Read more about the halt here. 

TIS THE SEASON: Experts warn US needs to better prepare for hurricane season

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As hurricane season arrives, experts say the country is still not adequately prepared.

They warn that as climate change continues to intensify extreme weather, the U.S. will need to adopt stronger resilience policies.

What are we facing this year?  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted that hurricane season, which starts Tuesday, will be above average, with between six and 10 hurricanes, following last year’s active season, which had 13 hurricanes.

What’s Biden doing about it? Last week, White House announced it would double the funding to $1 billion for the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s program that helps communities take on hazard mitigation projects.

President BidenJoe BidenThe Supreme Court and blind partisanship ended the illusion of independent agencies Missed debt ceiling deadline kicks off high-stakes fight Senate infrastructure talks spill over into rare Sunday session MORE’s infrastructure plan also calls for $50 billion in resilience funding.

“[$50 billion] is a good start,” said Chris Uejio, a co-author of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Building Resilience Against Climate Effects Framework. “I think the distributional aspect of it is just as important as the headline number.”

But the government will have a lot more to do going forward, he said, adding that such resilience issues could eventually cost much more to manage.

And what else can be done? In February, a group called the Resilience Action Fund wrote an open letter to the Biden administration calling for additional actions such as requiring minimum resilience standards for federally funded buildings and requiring such standards for buildings that get loans from federally backed mortgage organizations.

“You can divide the country into a handful of regions and say for these regions, we should have consistency of codes and standards,” said Aris Papadopoulos, the group’s chairman. 

Papadopoulos also said that the focus should be on homes, which he referred to as the “weak underbelly of our communities.”

Read more about the country’s vulnerability to hurricanes here. 

AT ITS CORPS: Progressives set sights on Civilian Climate Corps program

A progressive environmental group plans to focus its advocacy around President Biden’s proposal to create conservation and reforestation jobs, according to a strategy memo obtained by The Hill. 

The youth-led Sunrise Movement will be pushing for a Civilian Climate Corps (CCC) — similar to the New Deal-era Civilian Conservation Corps — which Biden backs. But the group says the $10 billion investment the president wants to make is not enough.

“As currently proposed, Biden’s Civilian Climate Corps is insufficient compared to the scale of the climate and jobs crises we face,” the memo said. “Our movement is fighting for a CCC that meets the moment and creates 1.5 million jobs over five years and trains a new workforce for long term careers in good, union jobs stopping the climate crisis.”

So tell me what you want, what you really really want. The Sunrise Movement is pushing for a version of the program that was introduced in a bill by Sen. Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyHuman rights can't be a sacrificial lamb for climate action Nearly 140 Democrats urge EPA to 'promptly' allow California to set its own vehicle pollution standards Senate Democrats press administration on human rights abuses in Philippines MORE (D-Mass.) and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezSunday shows preview: Delta concerns prompt CDC mask update; bipartisan infrastructure bill to face challenges in Senate House adjourns for recess without passing bill to extend federal eviction ban Democrats warn shrinking Biden's spending plan could backfire MORE (D-N.Y.) that would put more than $100 billion into the program over five years.

What are you gonna do about it?  The group said that it plans to organize on Capitol Hill alongside the two lawmakers and other “champions” to fight for “robust funding and passage of the CCC.”

In addition, it plans to launch digital campaigns, marches and actions targeted at Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerSenate infrastructure talks spill over into rare Sunday session Senate holds sleepy Saturday session as negotiators finalize infrastructure deal An August ultimatum: No recess until redistricting reform is done MORE (D-N.Y.) as well as Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayDemocrats consider scaling back new funds to fight next pandemic Tech executives increased political donations amid lobbying push Schumer, Tim Scott lead as Senate fundraising pace heats up MORE (D-Wash.) and Rep. Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottBiden celebrates anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act Now is the time to end the subminimum wage for people with disabilities House passes bill to ease standards for age discrimination cases MORE (D-Va.), who chair their chambers’ committees that deal with labor issues.

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Read more about the group’s goals here.

SOME CONGRESSIONAL CORRESPONDENCE: Lawmakers push for green funding, a look at Biden’s climate goals

Some green for green energy: A bipartisan group of lawmakers wrote to House leadership on Monday asking for the inclusion of an “accelerator” to finance clean energy and climate projects in infrastructure legislation. 

“As the U.S. House of Representatives moves to craft comprehensive legislation to rebuild our nation’s infrastructure and strengthen our economy long-term, we strongly urge you to include language that would establish a Clean Energy and Sustainability Accelerator,” wrote Reps. Debbie DingellDeborah (Debbie) Ann DingellNearly 140 Democrats urge EPA to 'promptly' allow California to set its own vehicle pollution standards The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi considers adding GOP voices to Jan. 6 panel Mercedes-Benz going all-electric by 2025 MORE (D-Mich.), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickGyms, hotels, bus companies make last-ditch plea for aid Democrats seek to calm nervous left Biden's corporate tax hike is bad for growth — try a carbon tax instead MORE (R-Pa.), Paul TonkoPaul David TonkoEnergy chief touts electric vehicle funding in Senate plan Nearly 140 Democrats urge EPA to 'promptly' allow California to set its own vehicle pollution standards OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden suspends Arctic oil leases issued under Trump |  Experts warn US needs to better prepare for hurricane season | Progressives set sights on Civilian Climate Corps MORE (D-N.Y.), and Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden suspends Arctic oil leases issued under Trump |  Experts warn US needs to better prepare for hurricane season | Progressives set sights on Civilian Climate Corps Overnight Energy: Biden admin backs Trump approval of major Alaska drilling project | Senate Republicans pitch 8 billion for infrastructure | EPA to revise Trump rule limiting state authority to block pipelines Biden signs bill to help Alaska cruise industry MORE (R-Alaska) in a letter to Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Justice Department says Trump's tax returns should be released | Democrats fall short of votes for extending eviction ban House adjourns for recess without passing bill to extend federal eviction ban Photos of the Week: Olympic sabre semi-finals, COVID-19 vigil and a loris MORE (D-Calif.) and Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthySunday shows preview: Delta concerns prompt CDC mask update; bipartisan infrastructure bill to face challenges in Senate After police rip Trump for Jan. 6, McCarthy again blames Pelosi Capitol Police asked to arrest the maskless MORE (R-Calif.). “Given the gravity and scale of the crises we are facing, it cannot be overstated how important this level of funding is for this effort to be a true success.” 

Let’s see that NDC: Top energy Republicans on Tuesday asked the Energy Department’s statistics agency to look at the impact of President Biden’s goal of cutting emissions at least in half by 2030 compared to 2005 levels. 

“When Congress and the public are presented with major, transformative policy proposals, it is important that we work to assess and understand their potential implications,” wrote Sens. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoSunday shows preview: Delta concerns prompt CDC mask update; bipartisan infrastructure bill to face challenges in Senate Tracy Stone-Manning's confirmation treatment was simply unacceptable — and it must stop Former Wyoming Sen. Mike Enzi dies after bicycle accident MORE (R-Wyo.) and Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersLatina lawmakers discuss efforts to increase representation CDC backtracks with new mask guidance CDC: Vaccinated people should now wear masks in high transmission areas MORE (R-Wash.). “EIA’s substantive independence along with its expertise, capabilities, and reputation make it the appropriate institution to model these announced targets.”

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 WHAT WE’RE READING:

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Nations begin 3 weeks of grueling climate talks online, The Associated Press reports

ICYMI...Stories from Tuesday and the long weekend

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Amazon, Red Cross partnering on faster deliveries of disaster relief supplies

Progressives set sights on Civilian Climate Corps program: exclusive

Experts warn US needs to better prepare for hurricane season

Biden administration suspends Arctic oil leases issued under Trump

OFF-BEAT AND OFFBEAT: If you won’t get vaccinated for yourself, get vaccinated for the West Virginia governor’s dog.