Feingold will vote 'no' on Wall Street bill

The move raises pressure on Senate Democrats to win the votes of Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellOvernight Energy: Trump administration issues plan to reverse limits on logging in Tongass National Forest| Democrats inch closer to issuing subpoenas for Interior, EPA records| Trump's plan to boost ethanol miffs corn groups and the fossil fuel industry Trump administration issues plan to reverse limits on logging in Tongass National Forest Zuckerberg defends meetings with conservative politicians, pundits MORE (D-Wash.) and a handful of Senate Republicans.

Senate Democrats aim to pass the Wall Street overhaul bill this week, but the passing of Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) has given them little room to negotiate votes. House and Senate lawmakers finalized the legislation in a conference process early Friday morning.

"As I have indicated for some time now, my test for the financial regulatory reform bill is whether it will prevent another crisis," Feingold said in a statement. "The conference committee's proposal fails that test and for that reason I will not vote to advance it."

Feingold and Cantwell voted against ending debate on the bill in May and against the overall bill. Democrats were able to advance the legislation with the help of Republican Sens. Scott Brown (Mass.), Olympia Snowe (Maine) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Energy: Perry to step down as Energy secretary | Future of big-game hunting council up in the air | Dems lose vote against EPA power plant rule Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe On The Money: Senate fails to override Trump veto over border emergency | Trump resort to host G-7 next year | Senators to push Turkey sanctions despite ceasefire | McConnell tees up funding votes MORE (Maine).

Brown has expressed disappointment at the final bill that passed through the conference committee. If he votes against the legislation in the Senate, Democrats will need to hold the rest of the votes they had in May and swing either Cantwell or another Republican to advance the bill.

Collins is reviewing the legislation, according to her office, and has not firmly committed to back the bill.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyState cites 38 people for violations in Clinton email review Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle mourn Cummings GOP cautions Graham against hauling Biden before Senate MORE (R-Iowa) voted for the underlying legislation in May, but voted against cutting off debate.