Snowe and Collins urged to support Disclose Act

“Your vote on the Disclose Act will be a vote on the most important government integrity reform measure to be considered thus far by the Senate in this Congress,” the letter states. “This critical ‘transparency’ legislation deserves your support. Any effort to filibuster the Disclose Act deserves your opposition.”

Support from Snowe and Collins could give Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDems open to killing filibuster in next Congress Webb: Questions for Robert Mueller Steyer's impeachment solution is dead wrong MORE (D-Nev.) the 60 votes he needs to pass the bill. But that assumes every Democrat in the upper chamber would vote in favor of the measure, which is unclear at this time. 

Sens. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinTop Democrats demand security assessment of Trump properties Democrats warm to idea of studying reparations Hillicon Valley: Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency plan | Trump vows to 'take a look' at Google's ties to China | Google denies working with China's military | Tech execs on defensive at antitrust hearing | Bill would bar business with Huawei MORE (D-Calif.) were critical of the bill’s NRA exemption that essentially allows them to not comply with the legislation. 

Tuesday’s letter, sent by organizations including the League of Women Voters, the Campaign Legal Center, and Democracy 21, suggests Snowe and Collins air their grievances with the bill before Reid sends it to the floor. 

“If you have concerns about any specific provision in the Disclose Act, we strongly urge you to resolve those issue through discussions with the sponsors of the legislation and not by voting to kill the legislation,” the letter states. 

Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTop Democrats demand security assessment of Trump properties Lawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens Trump administration denies temporary immigrant status to Venezuelans in US MORE (D-N.Y.) is the bill’s chief sponsor in the Senate.

The House passed the legislation 219-206 before adjourning for the July 4 recess. Its narrow victory has some wondering if it has enough momentum to get through the Senate.