Rep. Moran: Members should share pain of federal shutdown

A House Democrat introduced a measure Friday to prohibit members of Congress and the president from being paid during a government shutdown. 

Rep. Jim MoranJames (Jim) Patrick MoranBottom line Qatari embassy's correspondents weekend party light on jokes, big on dancing Spicer defends Trump's White House correspondents dinner boycott MORE (D-Va.) is sponsoring the companion bill to a measure introduced Thursday by Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerOnly four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates Only four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates Hispanic civil rights icon endorses Harris for president MORE (D-Calif.), chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, and Sen. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump, Biden go toe-to-toe in Iowa The Hill's Morning Report - Trump, Biden go toe-to-toe in Iowa Overnight Health Care: Biden infuriates abortion-rights groups with stance on Hyde Amendment | Trump tightens restrictions on fetal tissue research | Democrats plan event to scrutinize Trump's mental health MORE (D-Pa.), chairman of the Joint Economic Committee.

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"If we’re going to throw federal employees, including our staffs, out on the street, we should be right there with them," Moran said. "In the event of a shutdown, members should be eating peanut butter and jelly like everyone else."

Under current law, legislators and the president continue receiving their paychecks during a shutdown.

Boxer discussed the Senate bill on the floor Thursday and has asked Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTrump weighs in on UFOs in Stephanopoulos interview Trump weighs in on UFOs in Stephanopoulos interview Impeachment will reelect Trump MORE (D-Nev.) to hotline it because of the "real" threat of a government shutdown as the divide widens between Democrats and Republicans on spending issues. 

"If the government is forced to shut down, members of Congress and the president should be treated the same way as all other federal employees," Boxer said. "We should not be paid. And to take it one step further, we should not be paid retroactively once the government reopens." 

House Republicans have proposed $61 billion in cuts to fiscal year 2011 spending levels included in the stopgap measure that will keep the government running through March 4. 

Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerTed Cruz, AOC have it right on banning former members of Congress from becoming lobbyists Ted Cruz, AOC have it right on banning former members of Congress from becoming lobbyists Rep. Amash stokes talk of campaign against Trump MORE (R-Ohio) said Thursday he will refuse to pass a short-term continuing resolution (CR) if it doesn't include any spending cuts, in the case that the Senate and House are unable to reach an agreement before the deadline. 

The Senate left Washington late Thursday and the House remained in session Friday to continue working on the CR before leaving town for the weeklong Presidents Day recess. That leaves about four days, during the week of Feb. 28, to pass a bill that President Obama can sign, even if it's temporary.