Rogers hopeful despite blown budget deadline

The head of the House Appropriations Committee said Tuesday that he has some hope a budget deal could be done, despite the fact the budget conference committee failed to deliver a deal by Dec. 2.
 
Chairman Hal RogersHarold (Hal) Dallas RogersTrump says he'll decide on foreign aid cuts within a week Pelosi warns Mnuchin to stop 'illegal' .3B cut to foreign aid Appropriators warn White House against clawing back foreign aid MORE (R-Ky.) and his Senate counterpart, Chairwoman Barbara MikulskiBarbara Ann MikulskiLobbying World Only four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates Raskin embraces role as constitutional scholar MORE (D-Md.), had said a top-line budget deal must be done by Dec. 2 in order for their spending panels to put together an omnibus spending package by Jan. 15, when another government shutdown looms. 
 
Rogers said appropriators could still try to put something together, likely over the Christmas holiday, if budget negotiators Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanThree-way clash set to dominate Democratic debate Krystal Ball touts Sanders odds in Texas Republicans pour cold water on Trump's term limit idea MORE (R-Wis.) and Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayEXCLUSIVE: Swing-state voters oppose 'surprise' medical bill legislation, Trump pollster warns Overnight Health Care: Juul's lobbying efforts fall short as Trump moves to ban flavored e-cigarettes | Facebook removes fact check from anti-abortion video after criticism | Poll: Most Democrats want presidential candidate who would build on ObamaCare Trump's sinking polls embolden Democrats to play hardball MORE (D-Wash.) could get a deal by the time the House leaves for the year on Dec. 13.
 
“Paul Ryan is optimistic. He feels good about things, that leads me to believe we have a chance here,” Rogers told reporters.
 
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“I would have preferred to have the number yesterday but obviously I’m not the boss of that process,” he said. “So hopefully we will get a number by the 13th, and we will try to make it work.”
 
Rogers indicated he would like to see as much of the $91 billion in sequester cuts hitting discretionary spending in 2014 and 2015 replaced as possible. The top appropriator has said he wants to see mandatory entitlement spending curbed to give more breathing room to agency operating budgets and infrastructure projects.
 
“If we get an agreement by the middle of December, the Senate and us will try to work something out and I think we can, if the number is halfway decent,” he said.
 
Regarding what else a deal should include, Rogers deferred to Ryan. 
 
“I want to leave the budget negotiators all the room that they need to come to an agreement,” he said. “My goal in life is to get back to regular order.”
 
If no deal can come together, Rogers predicted appropriators would have to work through Christmas to try to get a spending solution by Jan. 15. The House budget topline is $967 billion, and the Senate spending bills are written to $1.058 trillion. 
 
“We may have to call up Santa to bring some elves to help us out,” he said.