Bachus agrees to hold hearing on bill to prevent insider trading by lawmakers

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Frank told Bachus in his letter that he had "neglected" similar legislation when he was chairman of the committee, but that recent attention to the matter meant the bill should be considered and passed.

The panel will consider a bill, introduced by Reps. Louise Slaughter (D-N.Y.) and Tim Walz (D-Minn.), which would prohibit members and White House employees from investing based on private information, or from passing that information along to others for investment purposes.

That legislation was introduced earlier in the 112th Congress, but languished until a new book and '60 Minutes' report suggested that several members may have personally profited based on information obtained as lawmakers.

Bachus, a longtime and active trader, was singled out in both, as they highlighted various moves that looked as if they could have been motivated by things he learned as a high-ranking lawmaker, including from private meetings held with financial regulators at the height of the financial crisis. The pieces also scrutinized moves made by House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerIs Congress retrievable? Boehner reveals portrait done by George W. Bush Meadows to be replaced by Biggs as Freedom Caucus leader MORE (R-Ohio) and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), who both defended their actions.

Bachus launched a spirited defense of his actions Wednesday, writing in a letter to the book's publisher that it was a "total lie" that he profited from non-public information, and detailing several errors in the book.

Similar bills are being introduced in the Senate by Sens. Scott Brown (R-Mass.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — House passes resolution rebuking Trump over Syria | Sparks fly at White House meeting on Syria | Dems say Trump called Pelosi a 'third-rate politician' | Trump, Graham trade jabs Senate confirms Trump's Air Force secretary pick Lobbying world MORE (D-N.Y.), and the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee will also discuss the issue at an upcoming hearing.