Durbin doubts passage of fast-track authority this year

The Senate’s second-ranking Democrat says he doesn’t expect Congress to push through expanded trade powers for President Obama this year.

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinNegotiators face major obstacles to meeting July border deadline Senate set to bypass Iran fight amid growing tensions Schumer calls for delay on passage of defense bill amid Iran tensions MORE (D-Ill.) told the Chicago Tribune it is "very unlikely" the White House would see the legislation passed this year.

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"I think Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidSenators briefed on US Navy's encounters with UFOs: report Key endorsements: A who's who in early states Trump weighs in on UFOs in Stephanopoulos interview MORE's statement was unequivocal, and that makes it very unlikely the president will be able to move this this year," Durbin said in an interview with Tribune columnist Melissa Harris published Sunday. 

Durbin said he was “critical and skeptical" of the trade promotion authority (TPA) the White House has requested to help facilitate negotiations on two massive global trade deals.

"It is a take-it-or-leave-it approach to trade agreements, which really deals members of Congress and their concerns out of the picture."

Many congressional Democrats are opposing fast-track authority, putting the president’s massive trade agenda in jeopardy.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said recently that he is against fast track and that "everyone would be well advised just to not push this right now."

Last week, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said she sees no future for a bill introduced in January by former Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusOvernight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms Congress gives McCain the highest honor Judge boots Green Party from Montana ballot in boost to Tester MORE (D-Mont.) and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.). 

Rep. Sandy Levin (D-Mich.), the top Democrat on the Ways and Means panel, has said that any legislation must set out a specific framework for congressional involvement, especially amid widespread complaints about a lack of transparency in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) talks.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids — Trump issues order to bring transparency to health care prices | Fight over billions in ObamaCare payments heads to Supreme Court Senate set to bypass Iran fight amid growing tensions Overnight Defense: House passes T spending package with defense funds | Senate set to vote on blocking Saudi arms sales | UN nominee defends climate change record MORE (D-Ore.) said he plans to take his time with a TPA bill and talk to wary Democrats about how to proceed, which would likely yield new legislation. 

TPA, also called fast-track, allows negotiated trade agreements to go through Congress without amendment on an up-or-down vote.

While the legislation would give the White House the ability to make those deals, U.S trade officials take guidance from Congress as to what they will or won't accept. 

For example, a majority in Congress support currency manipulation provisions, which haven't been discussed on the TPP deal.

Also, nations involved in trade deals want a guarantee that Congress wouldn't change the deals. 

Congress could turn back the agreements or yank TPA if they aren't happy with final agreements.

There are two huge trade agreements in talks — the TPP that includes Asian and South American nations — as well was a deal with the European Union, which is set to resume talks next month.