Report: Democrats receive more private-equity cash than GOP

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In a separate analysis of contributions from the last decade, eight of the top 10 lawmakers receiving private-equity funds were Democrats, according to the data. Over the time analyzed, then-Illinois Sen. Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaThe 10 Senate seats most likely to flip What does Joe Biden believe about NASA, space exploration and commercial space? The star of tomorrow: Temptation and a career in politics reporting MORE took in the largest amount, boosted in large part by the more than $1 million in private-equity contributions made in 2008 as he took on a presidential run. In 2011, Obama received $141,501 in contributions from private-equity sources as president.

His 2008 GOP opponent for the White House, Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainThe 10 Senate seats most likely to flip What does Joe Biden believe about NASA, space exploration and commercial space? The Memo: Activists press Biden on VP choice MORE (R-Ariz.), came in second, receiving an election-year windfall of $839,525 from organizations and people tied to the industry.

Of the remaining top 10, Sen. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkOn the Trail: Senate GOP hopefuls tie themselves to Trump Biden campaign releases video to explain 'what really happened in Ukraine' Why Republicans are afraid to call a key witness in the impeachment inquiry MORE (R-Ill.) was the only other Republican to receive large amounts of private-equity cash.

Given New York's status as home of the nation's financial center, the Democratic delegation of the state is represented well on the list. Former Sen. Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Americans debate life under COVID-19 risks The 10 Senate seats most likely to flip Stakes high for Collins in coronavirus relief standoff MORE came in third, followed by Sens. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDemocratic leaders say Trump testing strategy is 'to deny the truth' about lack of supplies Trump slams Sessions: 'You had no courage & ruined many lives' Senate Democrats call on Trump administration to let Planned Parenthood centers keep PPP loans MORE and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandIt's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process Hillicon Valley: Uber to lay off thousands of employees | Facebook content moderation board announces members | Lawmakers introduce bill to cut down online child exploitation Democrats introduce legislation to protect children from online exploitation MORE. Other influential Democrats also received substantial donations from the industry, including Sen. John KerryJohn Forbes KerryThe continuous whipsawing of climate change policy Budowsky: United Democrats and Biden's New Deal Overnight Energy: 600K clean energy jobs lost during pandemic, report finds | Democrats target diseases spread by wildlife | Energy Dept. to buy 1M barrels of oil MORE (Mass.), former Sen. Chris Dodd (Conn.) and Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidNevada congressman admits to affair after relationship divulged on podcast Overnight Energy: 600K clean energy jobs lost during pandemic, report finds | Democrats target diseases spread by wildlife | Energy Dept. to buy 1M barrels of oil Bottom line MORE (Nev.).

Reid's Republican counterpart, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Americans debate life under COVID-19 risks The 10 Senate seats most likely to flip Democratic leaders say Trump testing strategy is 'to deny the truth' about lack of supplies MORE (R-Ky.), comes in at number 11.

The analysis comes as Democrats have joined competing GOP candidates in bashing Romney for his time at Bain. Seeking to take advantage of Romney saying on Monday that he "likes being able to fire people" in the context of remarks on healthcare coverage, the Democratic National Committee hosted a press call Monday with a former employee of a company taken over by Bain.

DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) accused Romney of "creating wealth on the backs of American workers by laying them off and shipping their jobs overseas." She received $21,000 from PACs or individuals tied to private equity over that same timeframe, good for 194th on the list, according to Maplight.

The pressure on Romney has driven the private-equity industry into the political fight. The Private Equity Growth Capital Council issued a statement Monday accusing both parties of spreading "misinformation" about the industry and argued that private equity firms play a key role in the economy — and that their takeovers of companies can "often" lead to growth and job creation, not layoffs.