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Senate Finance unveils tax reform groups

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchPress: Forget bipartisanship — it's dead! Privatization of foster care has been a disaster for children Remembering Ted Kennedy highlights decline of the Senate MORE (R-Utah) is rolling out working groups to help his committee sift through the challenges of tax reform.

Hatch announced the creation of five separate working groups on Thursday, dealing with individuals, businesses, savings and investment, international issues and community development and infrastructure.

Each group will work with the Joint Committee on Taxation to create a report to be delivered to Hatch and the panel’s top Democrat, Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenGOP senator: Raising corporate taxes is a 'non-starter' Democrats get good news from IRS IRS chief warns of unpaid taxes hitting trillion MORE (D-Ore.), by the end of May.

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“Republicans and Democrats agree the American tax system is too complicated, unfair, and is hurting economic growth,” Hatch said in a statement.  

“With the launch of these working groups, members will have an opportunity to thoroughly examine the code and put forward smart ideas that will help lay the groundwork for a bipartisan tax overhaul that will provide bigger paychecks, better jobs, and more opportunity for all Americans.”

Former House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.) and Rep. Sandy Levin (D-Mich.) implemented a similar process in 2013, though the House went with 11 working groups. 

House tax writers generally praised the working group process, but Levin later complained that the process soon became much more partisan. Camp released a tax reform bill last year but it gained little traction, even among Republicans.

The move also comes as some senior Senate Republicans, like Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - All US adults can get vaccine; decision Friday on J&J vax GOP acknowledges struggle to bring down Biden Senate GOP to face off over earmarks next week MORE (S.D.), are discussing using budget reconciliation as a way to enact a broad deal to overhaul the tax code for businesses and improve the country’s infrastructure.

Sens. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleySenate aims to pass anti-Asian hate crimes bill this week 'Real Housewives of the GOP' — Wannabe reality show narcissists commandeer the party This week: Democrats move on DC statehood MORE (R-Iowa), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality Lummis adopts 'laser eyes' meme touting Bitcoin Senate swears-in six new lawmakers as 117th Congress convenes MORE (R-Wyo.) and Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowSerious about climate change? Get serious about agriculture Five things to watch on Biden infrastructure plan Senators introduce bipartisan bill to expand electric vehicle charging tax credit MORE (D-Mich.) will lead the individual working group, while Thune and Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinSenators in the dark on parliamentarian's decision When it comes to the Iran nuclear deal, what's a moderate Democrat to do? Battle lines drawn on Biden's infrastructure plan MORE (D-Md.) will lead the business group.

Sens. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoOn The Money: Inflation rears its head amid spending debate | IRS chief warns of unpaid taxes hitting T | Restaurants fret labor shortage IRS chief warns of unpaid taxes hitting trillion Trump faces test of power with early endorsements MORE (R-Idaho) and Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownWorld passes 3 million coronavirus deaths Democratic senators call on Biden to support waiving vaccine patents Big bank CEOS to testify before Congress in May MORE (D-Ohio) will be atop the savings group. Sens. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP Rep. Steve Stivers plans to retire Kellyanne Conway joins Ohio Senate candidate's campaign OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senate confirms Mallory to lead White House environment council | US emissions dropped 1.7 percent in 2019 | Interior further delays Trump rule that would make drillers pay less to feds MORE (R-Ohio) and Charles SchumerChuck Schumer'Real Housewives of the GOP' — Wannabe reality show narcissists commandeer the party 'Building Back Better' requires a new approach to US science and technology Pew poll: 50 percent approve of Democrats in Congress MORE (D-N.Y.) will lead the group tackling international issues, while Sens. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (R-Nev.) and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetDemocrats get good news from IRS Senators press for answers in Space Command move decision Biden announces first slate of diverse judicial nominees MORE (D-Colo.) will take the infrastructure group.