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Republican senators question legality of Obama flood order

Senate Republicans are questioning the legality of a new executive order from President Obama that sets standards for reducing the risk of floods. 

In a letter to Obama this week, eight GOP lawmakers implied the administration didn't solicit input from governors, mayors and other stakeholders when drafting the order, despite explicit instructions from Congress to do so.

“This calls into question the legality of the issuance of the January 30th order,” the letter to Obama says.

The president's order expands his proposed Climate Action Plan from 2013, and directs federal agencies to take actions to reduce the risk of flooding to federal investments.

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Under the order, agencies must measure whether new structures or facilities built in flood-prone areas, for example, meet the new standard. 

The senators questioning the move, whose states mostly border the Gulf of Mexico, asked the White House for more information about how the order was crafted, including the names of governors, mayors and other stakeholders that were consulted, along with all details of the correspondence. 

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