Senators scramble to save Farm Bill

Senate Agriculture Chairwoman Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann Stabenow It's time to let Medicare to negotiate drug prices Trump judicial nominee says he withdrew over 'gross mischaracterizations' of record Trump judicial nominee says he withdrew over 'gross mischaracterizations' of record MORE (D-Mich.) and ranking member Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsEPA exempts farms from reporting pollution tied to animal waste EPA exempts farms from reporting pollution tied to animal waste Conservatives spark threat of bloody GOP primaries MORE (R-Kan.) were scrambling Tuesday to save the $969 billion farm bill from failing on the Senate floor.

More than 100 amendments have been filed to the bill and more continue to pour in. Getting the farm bill to a final vote will require some agreement between Democrats and Republicans on a list of final amendments.

ADVERTISEMENT

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTrump weighs in on UFOs in Stephanopoulos interview Trump weighs in on UFOs in Stephanopoulos interview Impeachment will reelect Trump MORE (D-Nev.) wants to eliminate "non-germane" amendments but his Republican counterpart, Sen. Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellJon Stewart rips into McConnell for saying he's 'bent out of shape' over 9/11 victim fund Jon Stewart rips into McConnell for saying he's 'bent out of shape' over 9/11 victim fund Tensions with Iran reach new stage over uranium threat MORE (R-Ky.), is arguing that the must-pass legislation is a prime opportunity to enact a GOP priority wish list of anti-regulation legislation.

While the farm bill as drafted has the 60 votes it needs to pass, according to Stabenow and Roberts, the bill could fail if McConnell decides the GOP has not been treated fairly and urges the GOP conference to vote it down.

Roberts said that Farm Bill could fail.

“There is always that risk. The farmer puts his seed in the ground and hopes for a crop. That’s about where we are,” he said.

Roberts and Stabenow say they are still trying to finish up work on the farm bill this week, but aides say that deadline is very much in doubt.

The bill is vulnerable in part because it does not enjoy the full support of the Agriculture Committee, Sen. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanMcConnell ups pressure on White House to get a budget deal McConnell ups pressure on White House to get a budget deal There is a severe physician shortage and it will only worsen MORE (R-Ark.) said.  He and Sen. Saxby ChamblissClarence (Saxby) Saxby ChamblissRepublicans say Democrats holding up disaster relief as 'Sandy payback' Ex-House Intel chair: Intel panel is wrong forum to investigate Trump's finances The Hill's Morning Report - Trump budget reignites border security fight MORE (R-Ga.) are leading an effort to set up an alternative system of farm subsidies for rice and peanut farmers in the bill.

He said on Tuesday that time is running out on talks with Stabenow and Roberts on the effort, and that without agreement, he will vote against the bill.

The challenge Roberts faces on getting the GOP to back the bill does not stop there.

High-profile “non-germane” amendments to the farm bill include one from Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainOvernight Defense: US to send 1K more troops to Mideast amid Iran tensions | Iran threatens to break limit on uranium production in 10 days | US accuses Iran of 'nuclear blackmail' | Details on key defense bill amendments Overnight Defense: US to send 1K more troops to Mideast amid Iran tensions | Iran threatens to break limit on uranium production in 10 days | US accuses Iran of 'nuclear blackmail' | Details on key defense bill amendments Senators revive effort to create McCain human rights commission MORE (R-Ariz.), which would require the administration to report by August on the full effects of the $500 billion in automatic defense cuts slated to take effect starting next year.

McCain said Tuesday that his amendment is still in play, as are others cutting spending on catfish inspection and popcorn subsidies.

Another amendment, from Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulOvernight Defense: Pompeo blames Iran for oil tanker attacks | House panel approves 3B defense bill | Trump shares designs for red, white and blue Air Force One Senate rejects effort to block Trump's Qatar, Bahrain arms sales Senate rejects effort to block Trump's Qatar, Bahrain arms sales MORE (R-Ky.), would cut off aid to Pakistan over the conviction of Dr. Shakil Afridi, who aided the United States in finding the late terrorist Osama bin Laden.

“I will use whatever leverage I have to get a vote on aid to Pakistan,” Paul said. “I have to agree to any [amendment list] that is agreed to.”

Paul is also seeking to block grant the entire food stamp program.

Sen. Mike JohannsMichael (Mike) Owen JohannsMeet the Democratic sleeper candidate gunning for Senate in Nebraska Farmers, tax incentives can ease the pain of a smaller farm bill Lobbying World MORE (R-Neb.), a former Agriculture secretary, said the farm bill could pass if Reid would just start allowing votes to begin.

“We wasted this morning,” he said. “If Reid starts the voting, we can work it out.”

He said that he is insisting on votes on an amendment stopping the Environmental Protection Agency from regulating farm dust and from conducting aerial surveillance of livestock.

McConnell in a Senate floor speech said the GOP just wants commonsense restrictions on regulations.

He listed five, including one to require the Department of Labor to consult with Congress before implementing child labor regulations for farms, one that stops the EPA from regulating non-navigable waters, one preventing the farm dust rule, one concerning Dodd-Frank financial regulations on futures and one on aerial surveillance.

“These five common sense Republican amendments I have outlined, along with several others, put an end to numerous job-killing regulations and each of them deserve a vote,” he said.

It remains unclear if this list of amendments is a signal McConnell is willing to limit GOP changes to a short-list of anti-regulation provisions.

A Democratic aide said that Reid is just trying to get a fair and reasonable list of amendments without allowing the GOP to bog down the bill.

The aide said that an amendment agreement could be reached later Tuesday but as of mid-day the fate of the 2013 farm bill was up in the air. If the bill is not enacted by Sept. 30, farm law reverts to 1949 policies, and farmers would be exposed to the market without any modern risk protection.

The Stabenow-Roberts bill puts the United States on track to spend $969 billion over 10 years and trims $23.6 billion from projected deficits. It ends direct cash payments to farmers, regardless of whether they actually farm, and replaces them with an expanded crop insurance program to cover “shallow” losses.

That program is still too generous for both conservatives and the White House, who worry that crop insurance premium support could balloon if commodity prices fall for an extended period from historic highs.

The draft bill also cuts food stamps by $4.3 billion. Liberals, led by Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandOvernight Health Care: Democrats attack after Trump revives talk of ObamaCare replacement | Cruz, Ocasio-Cortez efforts on birth control face major obstacles | CVS investing M to fight teen e-cig use Overnight Health Care: Democrats attack after Trump revives talk of ObamaCare replacement | Cruz, Ocasio-Cortez efforts on birth control face major obstacles | CVS investing M to fight teen e-cig use Trump's 2020 campaign strategy is to be above the law MORE (D-N.Y.), are trying to restore the cuts while conservatives led by Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsSarah Sanders to leave White House Sarah Sanders to leave White House Barr compares his return to DOJ to D-Day invasion MORE (R-Ala.) want billions more saved through limitations and reforms. The food stamp fight is likely to go forward even if other amendment debates are set aside.