28 Republicans pledge to oppose any bill funding Planned Parenthood

28 Republicans pledge to oppose any bill funding Planned Parenthood
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Twenty-eight House Republicans now say they will oppose any legislation to fund the government that also continues to fund Planned Parenthood, according to an updated tally released on Tuesday by conservative group Heritage Action for America.

That’s the maximum number of Republicans that GOP leaders can lose in a vote without help from Democrats.

Ten more people have signed onto the letter, spearheaded by Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-S.C.), since it was initially sent to leadership in July.

An aide to Mulvaney said Tuesday that the letter will close later this week to give lawmakers an opportunity to sign it after returning to Capitol Hill from the August recess.

“We must act to fully defund Planned Parenthood. Please know that we cannot and will not support any funding resolution – an appropriations bill, an omnibus package, a continuing resolution, or otherwise – that contains any funding for Planned Parenthood, including mandatory funding streams,” the letter says.

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The latest lawmakers to sign the letter include Republican Reps. Ted YohoTheodore (Ted) Scott YohoOn The Money: Trump announces new China tariffs | Wall Street salaries hit highest level since 2008 | GOP bets the House on the economy GOP: The economy will shield us from blue wave House passes measure to identify, sanction hackers assisting in cyberattacks against US MORE (Fla.), Jody Hice (Ga.), David Rouzer (N.C.), Dave Brat (Va.), Mark Meadows (N.C.), Scott DesJarlais (Tenn.), Mark Walker (N.C.), Brian Babin (Texas), David SchweikertDavid SchweikertHillicon Valley: Trump considers revoking Obama-era officials' security clearances | Record lobbying quarter for Facebook, Amazon | Why Hollywood wants Google hauled before Congress | New worries about supply chain cyber threats The Hill's Morning Report — Russia furor grips Washington Freedom Caucus members see openings in leadership MORE (Ariz.) and Trent Kelly (Miss.), according to Heritage Action’s tally.

The letter was originally signed by GOP Reps. Mick Mulvaney (S.C.), Jim Jordan (Ohio), John FlemingJohn Calvin FlemingOvernight Energy: Watchdog opens investigation into Interior chief | Judge halts Pruitt truck pollution rule decision | Winners, losers in EPA, Interior spending bill amendments Five GOP lawmakers mulling bid to lead conservative caucus Coast Guard suspends search for missing Ohio plane MORE (La.), Raúl Labrador (Idaho), Matt SalmonMatthew (Matt) James SalmonArizona voters like Kyl but few think he'll stick around Former Sen. Jon Kyl to replace McCain in Senate Arizona governor faces pressure over McCain replacement MORE (Ariz.), Tim Huelskamp (Kan.), Jeff Duncan (S.C.), Thomas Massie (Ky.), Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyGowdy requests FEMA administrator’s travel records amid allegations Nunes: Russia probe documents should be released before election Gowdy: House Intel panel should release all transcripts from Russia probe MORE (S.C.), Walter Jones (N.C.), Curt Clawson (Fla.), Jim BridenstineJames (Jim) Frederick BridenstineNASA looking into selling naming rights for rockets to corporate brands: report NASA administrator says he always thought humans caused climate change We really are going back to the moon and then on to Mars MORE (Okla.), Keith Rothfus (Pa.), Randy WeberRandall (Randy) Keith WeberTo protect the environment, Trump should investigate Russian collusion Family of Santa Fe school shooting victim sues suspect's parents Santa Fe shooting suspect reportedly killed girl who turned down his advances MORE (Texas), Scott Perry (Pa.), Steve Pearce (N.M.), Trent FranksHarold (Trent) Trent FranksFreedom Caucus members see openings in leadership AP Analysis: 25 state lawmakers running in 2018 have been accused of sexual misconduct Jordan weathering political storm, but headwinds remain MORE (Ariz.) and Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertTrump: 'Fake news media’ didn’t cover when Obama said '57 states' in 2008 Bipartisan pair offers advice on ‘Climbing the Hill’ Trump allies want Congress to find anonymous op-ed author MORE (Texas).

While the number of signatures has grown over the August recess, it’s a very small number compared to the 80 House Republicans that signed onto a letter in 2013 pushing GOP leaders to defund ObamaCare. That led to a 16-day government shutdown that October.

House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBlue wave poses governing risks for Dems Nancy Pelosi: Will she remain the ‘Face of the Franchise’? Jordan hits campaign trail amid bid for Speaker MORE (R-Ohio) has so far called for congressional investigations into Planned Parenthood and has not said how he would address funding for the organization. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKey GOP senators appear cool to Kavanaugh accuser's demand Trump hints at new executive action on immigration, wants filibuster-proof Senate majority The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — The Hill interviews President Trump MORE (R-Ky.) suggested in an interview last week that it would have to wait for a new president.

Rep. Diane BlackDiane Lynn BlackTrump’s endorsements cement power but come with risks The Hill's Morning Report — Trump optimistic about GOP’s midterm prospects as Republicans fret Women poised to take charge in Dem majority MORE (R-Tenn.) has a stand-alone bill that would defund the organization and her spokesman said she has secured a “commitment” from House GOP leadership for her measure to come to a floor vote in the coming weeks.

Meanwhile, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzPoll: Cruz leads O'Rourke by 3 in Texas Senate race Julián and Joaquin Castro to campaign with O'Rourke in Texas The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump rips 'ridiculous' spending bill | FBI dragged into new fight | Latest on Maryland shooting MORE (R-Texas) is circulating a letter similar to Mulvaney’s in the Senate. An aide to Cruz said Tuesday that the letter will be finalized in the next few weeks.

Congress must pass legislation to keep the government funded through Oct. 1.