SPONSORED:

Trade leaders demand White House ramp up talks on TPP

Congressional trade leaders are demanding that the Obama administration immediately ramp up talks with lawmakers as negotiations on a massive Asia-Pacific agreement reach a critical stage.

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanDemocratic anger rises over Trump obstacles to Biden transition Feehery: A possible House Speaker conundrum for Democrats McCarthy faces pushback from anxious Republicans over interview comments MORE (R-Wis.), panel ranking member Sandy Levin (D-Mich.), Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchMellman: What happened after Ginsburg? Bottom line Bottom line MORE (R-Utah) and the panel's top Democrat, Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOn The Money: Push for student loan forgiveness puts Biden in tight spot | Trump is wild card as shutdown fears grow | Mnuchin asks Fed to return 5 billion in unspent COVID emergency funds Grassley, Wyden criticize Treasury guidance concerning PPP loans The FCC is trying to govern content moderation: It doesn't have the authority MORE (Ore.), said "we expect you to intensify these consultations and coordination immediately" on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

ADVERTISEMENT

In a letter to U.S. Trade Representative Michael FromanMichael B.G. FromanOn The Money: Sanders unveils plan to wipe .6T in student debt | How Sanders plan plays in rivalry with Warren | Treasury watchdog to probe delay of Harriet Tubman bills | Trump says Fed 'blew it' on rate decision Democrats give Trump trade chief high marks US trade rep spent nearly M to furnish offices: report MORE and Treasury Secretary Jack LewJacob (Jack) Joseph LewApple just saved billion in tax — but can the tax system be saved? Lobbying World Russian sanctions will boomerang MORE, they said that any agreement reached on the TPP must meet the priorities set out by Congress as part of the fast-track authority law signed by President Obama in June. 

If officials aren't ready to wrap up work on the TPP this week in Atlanta, the lawmakers suggested top trade officials take a step back before proceeding. 

“We urge you to take the time necessary to get the best possible deal for the United States working closely with us and with stakeholders to resolve the many outstanding issues in these critically important negotiations," they wrote in the letter. 

“If you are unable to obtain an agreement that is consistent with the standards we have set out, we would support continuing negotiations so that TPP meets the benchmark that Congress can support.”

Negotiations on the TPP slipped into Friday as the United States and 11 other nations try to complete work on the sweeping pact that covers 40 percent of global growth.