Majority of Senate Democrats back federal unemployment extension

"Unemployment insurance is an essential component of our ongoing economic recovery and provides support to workers and their families who have been laid off through no fault of their own as they search for work.”

More than 2 million would lose their federal benefits on Dec. 30 without congressional action.

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So far, no Republicans have expressed support for an extension, which would probably wind up being attached to a package that would halt tax hikes for most Americans and delay scheduled spending cuts. 

The plan has growing support among House Democrats, and the backing of the White House. 

In the past, Republicans have backed extensions, although they have been a battle to pass. 

Unemployed workers can receive upward of 47 weeks of federal benefits, based on a state's jobless rate, on top of between 20 and 26 weeks of state benefits. 

Without an extension, only state-level benefits would be available. Advocates are pushing for the continuation of the plan passed in January, which would curtail benefits as unemployment rates drop in the states.  

“We need to work together to create more job opportunities," Reed said. 

"But until the labor market improves, preserving UI is one of the most cost effective ways to help struggling families and businesses in our communities.”

A Congressional Budget Office report found that more than 300,000 jobs would be created by continuing the program, which accounts for $1.10 in economic activity for every $1 the government spends. 

A yearlong extension is estimated to cost about $30 billion. 

"Extending unemployment insurance helps sustain demand for local businesses during economic downturns by helping people pay their bills while they look for a new job," Reed said. 

"Cutting off UI now will sap buying power from this economy and could severely hinder the recovery."

Besides Reed, 41 senators signed the letter: Ron Wyden (Ore.), Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownTop Democrat: 'A lot of spin' coming from White House on infrastructure Schumer's moment to transform transit and deepen democracy Democrats ramp up pressure for infrastructure deal amid time crunch MORE (Ohio), Daniel Akaka (Hawaii), Tom Harkin (Iowa), Barbara Mikulski (Md.), John Kerry (Mass.), Debbie Stabenow (Mich.), Sheldon Whitehouse (R.I.), Tom UdallTom UdallOvernight Defense: Milley reportedly warned Trump against Iran strikes | Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer killed in Afghanistan | 70 percent of active-duty military at least partially vaccinated Biden nominates former Sen. Tom Udall as New Zealand ambassador Senate Democrats befuddled by Joe Manchin MORE (N.M.), Carl Levin (Mich.), Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Frank Lautenberg (N.J.), Richard Blumenthal (Conn.), Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerBottom Line World Health Day: It's time to fight preventable disease Lobbying World MORE (W.Va.), Maria Cantwell (Wash.), Kirsten Gillibrand (N.Y.), Al Franken (Minn.), Jeff Merkley (Ore.), Barbara Boxer (Calif.), Jean Shaheen (N.H.), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharBill would honor Ginsburg, O'Connor with statues at Capitol Overnight Health Care: CDC advises vaccinated to wear masks in high-risk areas | Biden admin considering vaccine mandate for federal workers Four senators call on Becerra to back importation of prescription drugs from Canada MORE (Minn.), Dianne Feinstein (Calif.), Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezLobbying world This week: Congress starts summer sprint The Innovation and Competition Act is progressive policy MORE (N.J.), Herb Kohl (Wis.), Patrick Leahy (Vt.), Bob Casey Jr. (Pa.), Chris Coons (Del.), Dick Durbin (Ill.), Ben Cardin (Md.), Jim Webb (Va.), Mark Begich (Alaska), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonTom Brady to Biden: '40 percent of the people still don't think we won' Rubio, Demings rake in cash as Florida Senate race heats up How transparency on UFOs can unite a deeply divided nation MORE (Fla.), Charles SchumerChuck SchumerAn August ultimatum: No recess until redistricting reform is done Biden to meet with 11 Democratic lawmakers on DACA: report Schumer's moment to transform transit and deepen democracy MORE (N.Y.), Mark Warner (Va.), Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), Mary Landrieu (La.), Michael Bennet (Colo.), Jeff Bingaman (N.M.), Patty Murray (Wash.), Kay Hagan (N.C.) and Daniel Inouye (Hawaii).