Wolin to temporarily take top slot at Treasury

Democrats expect Lew to win confirmation, though at least one prominent Republican, Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe 'pitcher of warm spit' — Veepstakes and the fate of Mike Pence FBI officials hid copies of Russia probe documents fearing Trump interference: book Tuberville breaks DC self-quarantine policy to campaign MORE (Ala.), and a member of the Democratic Caucus, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's Campaign Report: US officials say Russia, China are looking to sow discord in election Warren urges investment in child care workers amid pandemic Progressive candidate Bush talks about her upset primary win over Rep. Clay MORE (I-Vt.), have announced they will oppose the nomination. Top Democrats like Sens. Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerPostal Service says it lost .2 billion over three-month period A three-trillion dollar stimulus, but Chuck Schumer for renewable energy — leading businesses want to change that Democrats try to force Trump to boost medical supplies production MORE (N.Y.) and Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBottom line Bottom line The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation MORE (Mont.), the Finance Committee chairman, have already announced their support for Lew. 

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Geithner is exiting as Congress is dealing with the debt ceiling, though the Senate appears likely to take up a House GOP measure to take the debt limit off the table until at least May. 

Wolin, in addition to his four years as deputy Treasury secretary under Obama, also served under Robert Rubin and Larry Summers at Treasury during the Clinton administration.

He has been Treasury's lead defender of both the Dodd-Frank overhaul of financial regulations and its implementation. 

"There will, of course, continue to be disagreements and opposition as we move forward. There will be critics and naysayers. But those who are charged with implementing reform have not forgotten why we needed reform," Wolin said in a 2011 speech. "We needed reform because we can’t afford another crisis."

This post was updated at 2:20 p.m.