House Budget panel approves Ryan plan in 22-17 party-line vote

The House Budget Committee late Wednesday approved the latest budget from Chairman Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanKenosha will be a good bellwether in 2020 At indoor rally, Pence says election runs through Wisconsin Juan Williams: Breaking down the debates MORE (R-Wis.) on a party-line 22 to 17 vote.

All committee Republicans voted for the fiscal 2014 plan, which now heads to the full House for floor consideration next week.

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The committee vote was smoother than last year’s process.

That budget passed out of committee on a single vote margin after two conservatives — Reps. Tim Huelskamp (R-Kan.) and Justin AmashJustin AmashCentrist Democrats 'strongly considering' discharge petition on GOP PPP bill On The Trail: How Nancy Pelosi could improbably become president History is on Edward Snowden's side: Now it's time to give him a full pardon MORE (R-Mich.) — voted against it.

Huelskamp and Amash were removed by GOP leadership from the Budget Committee last year.

Ryan this year made a concession to conservatives and moved up the date when his budget would balance. Instead of taking until nearly 2040 to balance revenue and spending, the new Ryan plan has a $7 billion surplus in 2023.

To get there, the budget cuts $5.7 trillion, compared to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) baseline. Under a separate baseline used by Ryan, which does not assume large savings from a reduction in war and disaster spending, his budget would reduce spending by $4.6 trillion.

Some conservatives in the House GOP conference could still oppose the Ryan plan over criticisms that it relies too heavily on tax revenue and for counting deficit reduction from the president's healthcare reform law.

To reach balance, the budget relies on $600 billion in new tax revenues from the January "fiscal cliff" deal and hundreds of billions of dollars in additional revenues being raised from rosier CBO economic growth forecasts.

It also relies on $716 billion in cuts to Medicare spending brought on in the Affordable Care Act. Ryan himself, as last year’s GOP vice presidential candidate, blasted Obama for making the same cuts.

The budget keeps tax increases that were passed as part of the healthcare law, as well, something committee Democrats pointed out during a marathon markup that lasted until nearly midnight.

“It is simply a hoax to say this budget both balances in ten years and repeals 'ObamaCare,'” ranking member Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) said. “In fact, the dirty little secret is that this budget would not balance if not for the Medicare savings and all the revenues from ObamaCare.”

Van Hollen will once again offer his own budget alternative amendment next week on the floor.

In the Senate, Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurraySenate Democrats introduce legislation to probe politicization of pandemic response Trump health officials grilled over reports of politics in COVID-19 response CDC director pushes back on Caputo claim of 'resistance unit' at agency MORE (D-Wash.) on Thursday will stage her own marathon markup of what is slated to be the upper chamber's first budget in four years. Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidThe Supreme Court vacancy — yet another congressional food fight Trump seeks to turn around campaign with Supreme Court fight On The Trail: Battle over Ginsburg replacement threatens to break Senate MORE (D-Nev.) hopes to move the budget by the Easter recess.