Kaine will oppose Carson after Brown, Warren back nomination

Kaine will oppose Carson after Brown, Warren back nomination

Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KainePoll: Kaine leads GOP challenger by 19 points in Va. Senate race GOP offers to ban cameras from testimony of Kavanaugh accuser Corey Stewart fires aide who helped bring far-right ideas to campaign: report MORE (D-Va.) announced Monday that he would oppose Ben Carson’s nomination to head the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), citing his “zero experience” in that area.

In a statement, Kaine said he would vote against Carson on the Senate floor after the former neurosurgeon and GOP presidential candidate was cleared unanimously from the Senate Banking Committee.

“Putting someone in charge with zero experience in housing policy or urban development sends a message that the Department’s work is a low priority. I strongly object to this,” Kaine said in a statement. “Just as some positions demand medical expertise, HUD deserves a leader who embraces the Department’s mission and possesses the skills needed to run the nation’s largest housing and community development programs.”

Kaine, who ran last year as Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillary Clinton: FBI investigation into Kavanaugh could be done quickly Hillary Clinton urges Americans to 'check and reject' Trump's 'authoritarian tendencies' by voting in midterms EXCLUSIVE: Trump says exposing ‘corrupt’ FBI probe could be ‘crowning achievement’ of presidency MORE's vice presidential pick, is viewed as a more moderate Democrat. But his opposition to Carson comes after liberal stalwarts on the Banking Committee felt blowback from their base for letting Carson’s nomination pass without objection.

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Democratic Sens. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownOvernight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens Bipartisan group wants to lift Medicaid restriction on substance abuse treatment New polling shows Brown, DeWine with leads in Ohio MORE (Ohio) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOn The Money: Senate approves 4B spending bill | China imposes new tariffs on billion in US goods | Ross downplays new tariffs: 'Nobody's going to actually notice' Overnight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens Warren joins Sanders in support of striking McDonald's workers MORE (Mass.) both decided to support Carson’s nomination, saying they had heard enough in his hearing and in private conversations with Carson to support him.

Both are among the more vocal liberals in the Senate Democratic caucus. But both are also up for re-election 2018 — and Brown is running in a state Trump won.

Many liberals were vocally frustrated with the pair greenlighting Carson, particularly as part of a broader opposition to Democrats helping fill Trump's Cabinet.

Warren even felt compelled to further explain her support, taking to Facebook to explain why she voted for Carson despite her “deep, profound concerns” about his inexperience.

“Dr. Carson’s answers weren’t perfect. But at his hearing, he committed to track and report on conflicts of interest at the agency. In his written responses to me, he made good, detailed promises,” she wrote.

Kaine’s announced opposition, after 11 Democrats agreed with committee Republicans to quickly move his nomination, could be a sign that Democrats are feeling increased pressure to dig in against Trump’s team.

Kaine announced his opposition on the same day that Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerHouse Dems push to delay Kavanaugh vote for investigation Democrats should end their hypocrisy when it comes to Kavanaugh and the judiciary Celebrities back both Cuomo and Nixon as New Yorkers head to primary vote MORE (D-N.Y.) announced he would oppose five of Trump’s nominations, including his picks to head the Treasury, Labor and Health and Human Services Departments, though not Carson.