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GOP budget chair may not finish her term

GOP budget chair may not finish her term
© Greg Nash

House Budget Committee Chairwoman Diane BlackDiane Lynn BlackHow the Trump tax law passed: The final stretch Trump’s endorsements cement power but come with risks The Hill's Morning Report — Trump optimistic about GOP’s midterm prospects as Republicans fret MORE (R-Tenn.) might not finish out her congressional term as she focuses on her run for governor, according to a report in The Tennessean confirmed by The Hill.

“We haven’t made that decision yet,” Black was quoted as saying at a gubernatorial candidate forum at Nashville’s Tennessee State Fair.

Black added that she’s still hoping to pass a 2018 budget resolution through the House, but a whip count last week did not turn up the necessary votes. 

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The conservative House Freedom Caucus is withholding its support from the budget because they want more details on the plan for tax reform.

“I’m still doing what I promised I would do and that’s to try to get the budget across the line,” Black said. “It’s out of my committee, but I feel obligated to continue to work to get that done and we’re working on that right now.”

Black was expected to step down from her chairmanship after the resolution passed, and the competition to replace her as Budget chair is already in full swing. 

In August, The Hill reported that Reps. Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackBudget chairs press appropriators on veterans spending Senate chairman urges move to two-year budgetary process On The Money: Senate passes first 2019 spending bill | Trump hits Harley-Davidson in tariffs fight | Mnuchin rips report of investment restrictions | Justices side with American Express in antitrust case MORE (R-Ark.) Rob WoodallWilliam (Rob) Robert WoodallCook moves status of 6 House races as general election sprint begins 2 women win Georgia Dem runoffs, extending streak for female candidates Bourdeaux wins Georgia Dem runoff, in latest win by female candidates MORE (R-Ga.) and Bill Johnson (R-Ohio) were the central players on the committee seeking the gavel.