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Adoption tax credit restored after conservative backlash

Adoption tax credit restored after conservative backlash
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A tax credit for adoptive families has been retained in both the House and Senate GOP tax bills, following pushback from socially conservative lawmakers and anti-abortion groups.

The credit was initially removed in the House version of the legislation, but an amendment released Thursday from Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyBuchanan to seek top GOP position on Ways and Means Committee The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring On The Money: Senate confirms Gensler to lead SEC | Senate GOP to face off over earmarks next week | Top Republican on House tax panel to retire MORE (R-Texas) retained it.

Preserving the credit “will ensure that parents can continue to receive additional tax relief as they open their hearts and their homes to an adopted child,” Brady said Thursday during the fourth day of the committee markup.

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The Senate legislation also preserves the credit, Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court declines to hear challenge to Obama marine monument designation | Interior reverses course on tribal ownership of portion of Missouri river | White House climate adviser meets with oil and gas companies Senate GOP pushes back on list of participants in oil and gas leasing forum Small cities fret over feds redefining metro areas MORE (R-N.D.) said. The bill is set to be unveiled Thursday.

Religious groups, as well as House and Senate conservatives, pushed for the credit to be retained. They argued that by eliminating the credit, the bill went against the GOP’s anti-abortion platform.

The credit provides up to $13,570 in tax savings per adopted child. Keeping the credit will cost $3.8 billion over ten years, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation.

Initially, Brady said the House bill eliminated the deduction because only wealthier families who adopted were able to benefit from it, since the credit is only available to people who itemize their deductions.

House conservatives praised the decision to retain the credit.

“By helping remove financial barriers for families to adopt, Chairman Brady has written an outstandingly holistic pro-life and pro-family bill,” Rep. Trent FranksHarold (Trent) Trent FranksArizona New Members 2019 Cook shifts 8 House races toward Dems Freedom Caucus members see openings in leadership MORE (R-Ariz.), co-chairman of the House Pro-Life Caucus, said in a statement.

“The adoption tax credit has enormous symbolic, practical and humanitarian meaning and purpose, and I am deeply grateful that it’s been preserved in the tax plan and for all of those who acted to preserve it,” Franks added.

Republican Study Committee Chairman Mark Walker (R-N.C.) also commended Brady, saying in a statement “the adoption tax credit is pro-life and pro-family.”