Republicans slam Trump's tariffs plan

Republicans slam Trump's tariffs plan
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Congressional Republicans slammed President TrumpDonald John TrumpOvernight Health Care: US hits 10,000 coronavirus deaths | Trump touts 'friendly' talk with Biden on response | Trump dismisses report on hospital shortages as 'just wrong' | Cuomo sees possible signs of curve flattening in NY We need to be 'One America,' the polling says — and the politicians should listen Barr tells prosecutors to consider coronavirus risk when determining bail: report MORE’s decision to impose steep tariffs on aluminum and steel imports arguing that the move could kill jobs, damage the U.S. economy and hurt national defense.

Republican lawmakers have been outspoken in trying to convince Trump that he should narrow the tariffs if not outright scrap them over broader concerns that moving forward could spark a global trade war.

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Trump decided to exempt Canada and Mexico, two major allies and leading importers of steel and aluminum, from the sweeping action that will levy 25 percent tariffs on all imported steel and 10 percent on imported aluminum.

"Today, I am defending America’s national security by placing tariffs on foreign imports of steel and aluminum," Trump said at the White House.  

He said the domestic steel and aluminum industry has been “ravaged by aggressive foreign trade practices."

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchBottom line Bottom line Trump administration backs Oracle in Supreme Court battle against Google MORE (R-Utah), who sent a letter to Trump this week, called the move “a tax hike on American manufacturers, workers and consumers.”

“Slapping aluminum and steel imports with tariffs of this magnitude is misguided,” Hatch said.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanWho should be the Democratic vice presidential candidate? The Pelosi administration It's not populism that's killing America's democracy MORE (R-Wis.), who has been urging caution on the tariffs, said he is worried Trump's decision will have "unintended consequences."

"We will continue to urge the administration to narrow this policy so that it is focused only on those countries and practices that violate trade law," Ryan said.

Since the tariffs will take effect in 15 days, major trading partners and allies such as the European Union, United Kingdom, Australia and South Korea will have to scramble for an exemption.

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyMnuchin says Social Security recipients will automatically get coronavirus checks Pelosi not invited by Trump to White House coronavirus relief bill's signing Democrat refuses to yield House floor, underscoring tensions on coronavirus vote MORE (R-Texas) said while "exempting Canada and Mexico is a good first step, I urge the White House to go further to narrow these tariffs so they hit the intended target, and not U.S. workers, businesses and families."

Many Republicans argue the tariffs won’t do anything to achieve a major objective: curtailing China’s overcapacity of steel.

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerMcConnell, Romney vie for influence over Trump's trial RNC says ex-Trump ambassador nominee's efforts 'to link future contributions to an official action' were 'inappropriate' Lindsey Graham basks in the impeachment spotlight MORE (R-Tenn.), chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, who has recently patched up his relationship with Trump, blasted the president's approach to solving the overcapacity problem.

"A better way to level the playing field for American companies would be to rally our friends and allies to advance a robust, targeted effort to ensure that only those responsible for excess global capacity pay a price," Corker said. 

The United States already has more than 160 duties targeted at specific Chinese steel products.

But problems remain and a glut of global steel has caused prices to drop, hurting U.S. producers.

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP senator to donate 2 months of salary in coronavirus fight Senators pen op-ed calling for remote voting amid coronavirus pandemic Some Democrats growing antsy as Senate talks drag on MORE (R-Ohio), a former U.S. Trade Representative who has expressed support for using the 232 provision (which allows the president to unilaterally impose tariffs for national security reasons), said that "action is needed to address the worldwide overcapacity of steel, but I believe we should take a more targeted approach.”

“We should focus on countries that distort markets and repeatedly violate trade laws, and on the steel and aluminum products that are most at risk from a national security perspective," Portman said. 

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainEsper faces tough questions on dismissal of aircraft carrier's commander Democratic super PAC targets McSally over coronavirus response GOP senator suspending campaign fundraising, donating paycheck amid coronavirus pandemic MORE (R-Ariz.), who is battling brain cancer, accused Trump of trying to use the tariffs "as an excuse for protectionism" that could harm national defense by raising costs for the military.

"President Trump’s decision to impose steep tariffs on steel and aluminum imports will not protect America,” McCain said.

Instead, McCain said the United States "should confront China's unfair trade practices, including its attempts to circumvent existing antidumping tariffs and its pilfering of American invention and innovation through coercion and outright theft."

Under the tariffs plan, the president will have the discretion to add or subtract countries and raise and lower the tariffs at any time, a senior administration official said.

But Trump seemed set on his plan for now, saying he was eager to hear from other countries about what they would do to earn an exemption from the tariffs.

GOP Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseAmerica's governors should fix unemployment insurance Mnuchin emerges as key asset in Trump's war against coronavirus House Republican urges Pompeo to take steps to limit misinformation from China on coronavirus MORE (Neb.), who has been outspoken about the damage the tariffs could cause, said that the exemptions for Canada and Mexico were a good step but the tariffs could cause an unwanted trade war. 

"We’re on the verge of a painful and stupid trade war, and that’s bad. ... Temporary exceptions for Canada and Mexico are encouraging but bad policy is still bad policy, and these constant [North American Free Trade Agreement] NAFTA threats are nuts," he said in a statement.

Some Republicans argued that the tariffs have the potential of nixing any boost to the economy from the recently implemented tax-cut law.

"While I agree action should be taken to address overcapacity of steel and aluminum ... the proposed tariffs would nullify the positive gains created by the recent tax reform package passed by Congress," said Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsCoronavirus stimulus talks hit setback as crisis deepens Garth Brooks accepts Library of Congress's Gershwin Prize for Popular Song GOP, Democrats hash out 2020 strategy at dueling retreats MORE (R-Kansas), who has urged the president to consider the importance of U.S. agriculture in the tariffs equation. 

Republican leaders said they would continue to lobby the administration to narrow the tariffs and avoid retaliation from around the world. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFlorida Democrat hits administration over small business loan rollout The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Dybul interview; Boris Johnson update Schumer says nation will 'definitely' need new coronavirus relief bill MORE (R-Ky.) said he is concerned about the scope of the proposed tariffs and how they will affect U.S. businesses, consumers and his home state of Kentucky.

The European Union singled out Kentucky bourbon as a possible target for punishment for Trump's tariffs.

"Important questions remain about whether ultimately these tariffs will be sufficiently targeted, tailored and limited," McConnell said.

GOP lawmakers on Capitol Hill have spent the past week sending letters and calling the president, urging him to make the tariffs more targeted at the problem with China’s overcapacity of steel.

Rep. Jackie WalorskiJacqueline (Jackie) R. WalorskiNew FDA policy allows lab animals to be adopted after experiments Congressional leaders unite to fight for better future for America's children and families The Suburban Caucus: Solutions for America's suburbs MORE (R-Ind.), a member of the House Ways and Means Committee that oversees trade matters, said the tariffs remain too broad and will hurt jobs.

“Anything other than a balanced and targeted approach will raise costs for manufacturers, slow our economic momentum and let bad actors like China off the hook,” said Walorski, who also sent Trump a letter earlier this week.

Other Republicans vowed to take action, although it's unclear what, if anything, the GOP-controlled Congress would be willing to do to blunt Trump's tariffs or limit his ability to determine trade policy.

Minutes after the announcement, GOP Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeMcSally campaign to suspend TV ads, canvassing amid pandemic Coronavirus isn't the only reason Congress should spend less time in DC Trump Jr. says he inherited 'Tourette's of the thumbs' from his father MORE (Ariz.) said he would be introducing legislation to nullify the tariffs, saying "Congress cannot be complicit as the administration courts economic disaster."

"I will immediately draft and introduce legislation to nullify these tariffs, and I urge my colleagues to pass it before this exercise in protectionism inflicts any more damage on the economy," Flake said in a statement.

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeJustice IG pours fuel on looming fight over FISA court Senator Tom Coburn's government oversight legacy Trump on Romney's negative coronavirus test: 'I am so happy I can barely speak' MORE (R-Utah) introduced legislation last year that would give Congress oversight over any trade decision, including implementing tariffs.

A spokesman for Lee told The Hill that the Utah Republican “has talked with many of his colleagues about the bill" since the administration first floated the tariffs.

But any bill to rein in or override Trump would be all but guaranteed to draw opposition from the White House. And a likely veto threat would require it to ultimately garner the support of two-thirds of the members in both chambers — a potentially herculean task for a GOP-controlled Congress against a Republican president.