Bipartisan House bill would replace consumer director with panel

Bipartisan House bill would replace consumer director with panel
© Greg Nash

A bipartisan group of House members on Wednesday released a bill that would replace the director of the controversial Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) with a five-person commission.

The bill from Reps. Dennis RossDennis Alan RossGOP, White House start playing midterm blame game Reshaping US aid to the Palestinians Trump allies want Congress to find anonymous op-ed author MORE (R-Fla.), Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), Ann WagnerAnn Louise WagnerCongress should provide parents an opportunity to care for newborn and adopted children Paid family leave could give new parents a much-needed lifeline Vulnerable Republicans include several up-and-coming GOP leaders MORE (R-Mo.) and David ScottDavid Albert ScottAssociated Press to replace exit polls with voter survey after 2016 inaccuracies Overnight Regulation: Senate passes Dodd-Frank rollback | SEC charges Theranos CEO with 'massive fraud' | Former Equifax exec charged with insider trading | FEC proposes changing digital ad rules Bipartisan House bill would replace consumer director with panel MORE (D-Ga.) would rename the CFPB and replace its director with a bipartisan panel.

While the bill would easily pass the House, it would likely be filibustered in the Senate by Democrats who have protested changes to the CFPB.

Under the bill, the CFPB would become the Financial Product Safety Commission, directed by a panel appointed by the president. No more than three commissioners could be from the same political party, and the president could remove a member for “inefficiency, neglect of duty, or malfeasance.”

The bill is an attempt to rein in the CFPB director’s sole control over the agency’s extensive authority. Republicans have long insisted that the bureau, opened in 2013, is too powerful, immune from congressional oversight and dependent on the whims of the director.

The CFPB issued a slew of regulations and pursued aggressive actions against financial companies suspected of wrongdoing under former director Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayTrump: 'Good news' that Obama is campaigning again Election Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls Mulvaney plans to move some consumer bureau staff to new Atlanta office MORE. While Democrats praised Cordray for his tough oversight of lenders, Republicans and the financial sector argued the CFPB overstepped its boundaries.

Supporters of the CFPB commission say a five-person panel would provide more stability for the agency and prevent any political ideology from dominating the agenda. Acting CFPB Director Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyProtect the Military Lending Act On The Money: Midterms to shake up House finance panel | Chamber chief says US not in trade war | Mulvaney moving CFPB unit out of DC | Conservatives frustrated over big spending bills Warren suggests Mulvaney broke law by speaking to GOP donors MORE, a staunch conservative, has enraged liberal former allies of the bureau by scaling back the agency’s operations.

Democrats say installing a CFPB commission would hinder the agency from fulfilling its mission, laid out in the Dodd-Frank Act, to protect consumers from risky financial products and fraud. They insist that Republicans could kneecap the CFPB by refusing to confirm commissioners.

The bill seeks to limit those concerns by allowing the commission to approve all agency actions with just two of five commissioners in place.

Major financial sector lobbying groups that have sought to rein in the bureau endorsed the bill shortly after its release.

The Consumer Bankers Association, National Association of Federally-Insured Credit Unions and Credit Union National Association praised the measure in Wednesday statements.