Trump’s budget chief talks spending clawback with key chairman

Trump’s budget chief talks spending clawback with key chairman
© Greg Nash

President TrumpDonald John TrumpWith VP pick, Biden can't play small ball in a long ball world Coronavirus hits defense contractor jobs Wake up America, your country doesn't value your life MORE’s budget chief met with House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rodney FrelinghuysenRodney Procter FrelinghuysenRepublican lobbying firms riding high despite uncertainty of 2020 race Ex-Rep. Frelinghuysen joins law and lobby firm The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority MORE (R-N.J.) on Friday to discuss a White House proposal to claw back some of the federal spending increases that Congress passed last month.

Office of Management and Budget Director Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyTrump to nominate Russell Vought as budget chief Warren, Brown press consumer bureau on auto lending oversight Bottom line MORE told The Hill that the administration is still working out the details of a package of rescissions that will rescind some of the funding hikes that were recently adopted in the 2018 omnibus spending bill.

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“We’re probably going to start meeting on the details early next week,” Mulvaney told The Hill, before heading into the meeting in Frelinghuysen’s office in the Capitol building.

The meeting comes several days after Frelinghuysen told reporters that there had been no communication with the White House about the rescissions proposal.

The package is expected to come in several pieces, the first of which could land on Capitol Hill early next month. It would then need to be approved by both chambers with a simple majority vote. 

The effort to claw back federal spending comes after conservative members balked over the price tag of the $1.3 trillion omnibus. Trump briefly threatened to veto the funding package, but ultimately signed the bill, though he made clear he was unhappy with the legislation.

Proponents say the rescission package could give Republicans an opportunity to boost their fiscal credentials ahead of a difficult midterm election cycle. 

But there is concern among Democrats and Republican appropriators that utilizing the maneuver could hinder their ability to negotiate deals across the aisle in the future.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellCoronavirus pushes GOP's Biden-Burisma probe to back burner Struggling states warn coronavirus stimulus falls short Hillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike MORE (R-Ky.) said it would be ill-advised for Republicans to walk back on the deal they made with Democrats, telling Fox News, “You can’t make an agreement one month and say, ‘OK, we really didn’t mean it.’”