Senate chairman urges move to two-year budgetary process

Senate chairman urges move to two-year budgetary process

Senate Budget Committee Chairman Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziProgressives seek defense freeze in budget talks Five takeaways from Trump's budget Trump releases budget calling for 5 percent cuts in domestic spending MORE (R-Wyo.) is throwing his support behind a two-year budget and appropriations process, an option actively being considered by a joint select committee examining the budget process.

“I have long believed that moving to biennial appropriations would allow for greater transparency and congressional oversight of executive branch program spending and management,” Enzi wrote in a letter to the co-chairs of the joint select committee, Rep. Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackGOP rep defends Trump's border emergency declaration Top Republican says Trump's budget sets priorities, includes 'tough decisions' Chances of passing Dem budget are '50-50,' says chairman MORE (R-Ark.) and Rep. Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyLeft-wing Dems in minority with new approach to spending On The Money: Trump issues first veto, warning of 'reckless' resolution | US hits Russia with new sanctions | Dems renew push for contractor back pay | Lawmakers seek probe into undocumented workers at Trump businesses House Dems renew push for government contractor back pay MORE (D-N.Y.), dated May 29 and obtained by The Hill.

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Enzi recommended considering six of the 12 appropriations bills in the first session of a congressional term, and the other half the second session.

“By halving the number of bills required to be adopted annually, Congress could create space for itself to devote more time and attentions to oversight and other national priorities,” he wrote.  

Enzi has previously suggested that the Senate Budget Committee could be eliminated altogether

The joint select committee is considering options including adopting a two-year cycle and aligning the budget to the calendar year instead of the fiscal year, which currently begins in October.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanPaul Ryan says Trump will win reelection because of 'record of accomplishment' Pence loses House office space Dem budget chair: Trump 2020 proposal 'cruel-hearted' MORE (R-Wis.) is scheduled to testify on Wednesday before the joint select committee, which has instructions to produce recommendations on reforming the budget process by year’s end.

Budget experts lament that the budget process will not yield better fiscal results so long as it remains divorced from revenues, which are set in separate processes in different committees. 

On Tuesday, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office projected that federal debts are on track to double over the course of the next 30 years, surpassing historical records along the way and racking up huge interest payments, which will dominate government spending.