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Senate clears $154B ‘minibus’ spending measure

Senate clears $154B ‘minibus’ spending measure
© Anna Moneymaker

The Senate cleared a second appropriations measure funding four federal departments on Wednesday as it works to meet a Sept. 30 deadline for keeping the government open.

In a 92-6 vote, the Senate approved a “minibus” funding the Agriculture, Transportation, Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Interior Departments. The $154.2 billion measure also provides funding for financial services and general government.

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The six senators that voted against, all Republican, were Sens. Ten Cruz (Texas), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold Johnson14 Republicans vote against making Juneteenth a federal holiday Senate passes bill to make Juneteenth a federal holiday Jon Stewart: Coronavirus 'more than likely caused by science' MORE (Wis.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC GOP senators press Justice Department to compare protest arrests to Capitol riot MORE (Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior Rand Paul does not support a national minimum wage increase — and it's important to understand why Fauci to Chelsea Clinton: The 'phenomenal amount of hostility' I face is 'astounding' MORE (Ky.), Ben SasseBen SasseGOP senators applaud Biden for global vaccine donation plans Pence: Trump and I may never 'see eye to eye' on events of Jan. 6 White House: Biden will not appoint presidential Jan. 6 commission MORE (Neb.) and Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (Pa.), mostly in protest of the overall spending level.

The Senate has now approved packages that including funding for agencies and programs in seven of the 12 traditional bills that need to be approved to fund the government.

The legislation largely rejects President TrumpDonald TrumpChinese apps could face subpoenas, bans under Biden executive order: report Kim says North Korea needs to be 'prepared' for 'confrontation' with US Ex-Colorado GOP chair accused of stealing more than 0K from pro-Trump PAC MORE’s budget proposal, which sought massive cuts in discretionary spending. The Senate bills are part of a framework that would increase discretionary spending by $5 billion compared to 2018.

The Senate also rejected the more partisan approach in the House, where companion bills include conservative policy riders deemed “poison pills” by Democrats. The policy riders in the House bills seek to cancel Obama-era environmental regulations and shield politically active churches from losing their tax exempt status.

The different approaches will lead to a battle between the House and Senate in September, when the lower chamber returns from recess.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell shoots down Manchin's voting compromise Environmental groups urge congressional leaders to leave climate provisions in infrastructure package Loeffler meets with McConnell amid speculation of another Senate run MORE (R-Ky.) is seeking to avoid both a shutdown and the need to pass a mammoth omnibus spending bill. President Trump vowed to never again sign an omnibus of that size after doing so earlier this year.

The Senate last month passed its first package of government funding bills, which merged money for energy and water, the legislative branch and military construction and veterans affairs.

Senators said their staff would be in touch with their House counterparts over the recess to begin merging the competing legislation.

The Senate is now expected to turn to funding for the Defense Department and Department of Health and Human Services, after taking next week off for its own recess.

Both bills can be lightning rods for controversial amendments, but senators hope moving them together will defuse any potential political fights.

“We hope to tie them together, marry them,” said Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyOn The Money: Sanders: Democrats considering trillion spending package | Weekly jobless claims rise for first time since April Shelby signals GOP can accept Biden's .5T with more for defense Senate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior MORE (R-Ala.), the chairman of the Appropriations Committee. “Let's see how the marriage works.”

Leadership in both parties have made returning to regular order on funding the government a top priority after years of gridlock.

They’re expected to get up to nine of the 12 spending bills to Trump’s desk before the Sept. 30 deadline. Doing so would mean Congress would have to also approve a short-term continuing resolution (CR) to fund the rest of the government.

Shelby and Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyShelby signals GOP can accept Biden's .5T with more for defense Bipartisan lawmakers want Biden to take tougher action on Nicaragua Biden budget expands government's role in economy MORE (Vt.), the top Democrat on the Appropriations Committee, agreed to avoid poison pill proposals as they moved appropriations bills through their committee.

Leahy acknowledged there may be difficulties with the House.

“The House is proceeding on a different path. They have passed partisan bills filled with poison pill riders that cannot and will not pass the Senate,” Leahy said.

One looming issue is funding for a border wall. Trump has threatened to force a shutdown if Congress does not provide money for his priority.

Additional border wall funding would face an uphill fight in the Senate, where Republicans hold just a 51-49 majority. Democrats have demanded that additional border wall money be linked to a deal on “Dreamers,” certain immigrants who came into the country illegally as children.

Top Republicans are trying to downplay the chances of a shutdown over the border wall.

“It's not a good thing for anybody. And certainly 30 days before an election, having the prospect of a government shutdown out there is not something that I certainly would look forward to have happening,” said Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneYellen: Disclosure of tax data to ProPublica a 'very serious situation' Sanders won't vote for bipartisan infrastructure deal Bipartisan infrastructure deal takes fire from left and right MORE (R-S.D.), the No. 3 Senate Republican. “I hope the administration comes to that conclusion as well.”