Blue-state Republicans say they will vote against 'tax cuts 2.0' if it extends SALT cap

Blue-state Republicans say they will vote against 'tax cuts 2.0' if it extends SALT cap
© Greg Nash

Four blue-state Republicans say they will be "forced to oppose" a second round of tax cuts if the legislation includes a provision permanently extending the $10,000 cap on the state and local tax (SALT) deduction.

The House Ways and Means Committee is scheduled to consider legislation on Thursday that makes permanent the individual tax changes in President TrumpDonald TrumpUkraine's president compares UN to 'a retired superhero' Collins to endorse LePage in Maine governor comeback bid Heller won't say if Biden won election MORE's 2017 tax law, including the SALT deduction cap. The measure is expected to receive a vote on the House floor later this month.

GOP Reps. Dan Donovan (N.Y.), Pete KingPeter (Pete) KingBiden pays homage to Obama by rocking tan suit during birthday week Newsmax anchor Greg Kelly to host New York radio show Top GOP lawmakers call for Swalwell to be removed from Intelligence Committee MORE (N.Y.), Frank LoBiondoFrank Alo LoBiondoVan Drew-Kennedy race in NJ goes down to the wire Van Drew wins GOP primary in New Jersey Amy Kennedy wins NJ primary to face GOP's Van Drew MORE (N.J.) and Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithOvernight Defense & National Security — Breakneck evacuations continue as Biden mulls deadline Overnight Defense & National Security: Outcry over Biden's Afghanistan deadline Lawmakers from both parties push back at Biden's Aug. 31 deadline MORE (N.J.) all voted against last year's tax-cut legislation because of the SALT deduction cap and are urging House GOP leaders to avoid cementing the provision with the new legislation.

ADVERTISEMENT

"We urge leadership to stop any effort to permanently cap the deduction for State and Local taxes at $10,000 or we would be forced to oppose the bill," the Republican lawmakers wrote in a letter to Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanPaul Ryan researched narcissistic personality disorder after Trump win: book Paul Ryan says it's 'really clear' Biden won election: 'It was not rigged. It was not stolen' Democrats fret over Trump-district retirements ahead of midterms MORE (R-Wis.) and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyHouse panel advances key portion of Democrats' .5T bill LIVE COVERAGE: Ways and Means to conclude work on .5T package LIVE COVERAGE: Tax hikes take center stage in Ways and Means markup MORE (R-Texas). The letter was dated Friday and released on Wednesday.

The New York and New Jersey Republicans said that the SALT deduction cap disproportionately impacts their states, which send more to the federal government in taxes than they receive back. The lawmakers expressed concerns that curbing the deduction will hurt housing prices.

"The state and local tax deduction promotes homeownership, increased funding for local infrastructure projects, public education and other state run services – programs that help foster U.S. production and reduce income inequality," the lawmakers wrote.

"Eliminating this deduction will eliminate the incentive for people to live where local government stewards the public. The cost of these local public services in communities across the country, especially in New York and New Jersey, will only increase further, negatively impacting those who benefit from these programs every day."

Besides the SALT deduction cap, the 2017 tax law's cuts to individual tax rates, increase in the standard deduction and increase in the child tax credit also are currently set to expire after 2025.

The blue-state GOP lawmakers said they support making the individual tax cuts permanent but said they "cannot sit idle as a deduction that benefits Americans across the country is permanently dismantled."

Donovan, King, LoBiondo and Smith aren't the only blue-state Republicans who have come out against the second round of tax cuts over concerns about the SALT deduction. Rep. Leonard LanceLeonard LanceKean Jr. to run against Malinowski: report Thomas Kean wins GOP primary to take on Rep. Tom Malinowski Gun debate to shape 2020 races MORE (R-N.J.), who also voted against the 2017 law, has said he opposes the second tax package.

Lance and Donovan are both running for reelection in competitive races, while LoBiondo is retiring.

Brady has defended the SALT deduction cap, arguing that blue-state governors should cut their states' taxes.