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Republican McHenry announces bid for Financial Services ranking member

Republican McHenry announces bid for Financial Services ranking member
© Camille Fine

Rep. Patrick McHenryPatrick Timothy McHenryMcCarthy unveils House GOP task forces, chairs On The Money: House panel spars over GameStop, Robinhood | Manchin meets with advocates for wage | Yellen says go big, GOP says hold off House panel spars over GameStop frenzy, trading apps MORE (R-N.C.) on Thursday announced he is running to be the top Republican on the House Financial Services Committee in the next Congress.

McHenry, the Financial Services panel’s current vice chairman, said Thursday he would run to be the committee's ranking Republican in 2019. The congressman said he would be “continuing my conversations with my House Republican colleagues as I make the case for why I’m the best candidate to lead our committee going forward.”

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McHenry touted a record of working "with both Republicans and Democrats to increase access to capital for American small businesses and families."

Current Financial Services Chairman Rep. Jeb HensarlingThomas (Jeb) Jeb HensarlingLawmakers battle over future of Ex-Im Bank House passes Ex-Im Bank reboot bill opposed by White House, McConnell Has Congress lost the ability or the will to pass a unanimous bipartisan small business bill? MORE (R) is retiring at the end of his term.

The Hill reported last week that McHenry was expected to seek the top minority spot on the committee if Republicans lost control of the House in Tuesday’s midterm elections.

McHenry, the GOP chief deputy whip, is widely respected among Financial Services panel members, House Republicans and industry advocates. He was poised to climb the House leadership ladder if Republicans held onto the lower chamber after the retirement of Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanBiden's relationship with top House Republican is frosty The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Facebook upholds Trump ban; GOP leaders back Stefanik to replace Cheney Budowsky: Liz Cheney vs. conservatives in name only MORE (R-Wis.), likely replacing Rep. Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseFreedom Caucus Republican says Cheney was 'canceled' Stefanik formally launches bid to replace Cheney in House GOP leadership GOP votes to dump Cheney from leadership MORE (La.) as the top GOP vote-counter.

"Like every House Republican, I was deeply disappointed by Tuesday’s election results and saddened that many of our dear friends will not be returning to Congress in January," McHenry said in a statement. "But now is the time to move forward."

Two of McHenry's potential challengers pledged their support after his announcement

GOP Reps. Blaine LuetkemeyerWilliam (Blaine) Blaine LuetkemeyerDemocratic Kansas City, Mo., mayor eyes Senate run Keeping fintech's promise: A modest proposal Wall Street spent .9B on campaigns, lobbying in 2020 election: study MORE (Mo.) and Bill Huizenga (Mich.) had both said before the election they would run to be the top Financial Services Republican, but only if McHenry did not seek the position.

Luetkemeyer said in a Thursday statement that he offered "my unwavering support for Patrick’s candidacy to be the Ranking Republican on the Committee, and believe he is the right man for the job.”

Brian Patrick, a spokesman for Huizenga, said Thursday that “We are 100 percent supportive of Mr. McHenry running for Ranking Member.”

And Rep. Frank LucasFrank Dean LucasOn The Trail: Texas underscores Democrats' struggle with voter turnout GOP lawmaker calls for bolstering research budgets to help space program The Hill's Morning Report - With trial over, Biden renews push for COVID-19 bill MORE (R-Okla.), who also considered a run to lead Financial Services Republicans, rolled out his bid for the top minority spot on the House Science Committee shortly after McHenry’s announcement.

McHenry is poised to serve as the Republican foil to Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersJuan Williams: Tim Scott should become a Democrat The Hill's Morning Report - Biden address to Congress will dominate busy week Maxine Waters: Judge in Chauvin trial who criticized her was 'angry' MORE (D-Calif.), the top Democrat on the committee who is poised to take the gavel.

Waters has pledged to investigate sales scandals at Wells Fargo and President TrumpDonald TrumpWarren says Republican party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' More than 75 Asian, LGBTQ groups oppose anti-Asian crime bill McConnell says he's 'great admirer' of Liz Cheney but mum on her removal MORE's financial connections to Deutsche Bank while also pursuing affordable housing and consumer protection bills.

McHenry warned that he will "fight back against any efforts by Democrats to use this committee to roll back our successes from the last two years or use the committee as the launch pad for endless, partisan investigations."

"The American people sent us here to get our work done," McHenry said. "I intend to do that and I hope our Democrat colleagues share that commitment."