Trump has discussed firing Fed chief after latest interest rate hike: report

President TrumpDonald John TrumpPence: It's not a "foregone conclusion" that lawmakers impeach Trump FBI identifies Pensacola shooter as Saudi Royal Saudi Air Force second lieutenant Trump calls Warren 'Pocahontas,' knocks wealth tax MORE has discussed firing Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell after the central bank announced this week that it would raise interest rates, Bloomberg reports

The Fed’s policymaking arm, the Federal Open Market Committee, voted Wednesday to raise the baseline interest rate range to 2.25 to 2.5 percent, a 0.25 percentage point increase.

The decision was staunchly opposed by Trump, who had for months argued that rates should not rise. 

According to Bloomberg, the decision led Trump to privately discuss firing Powell. Unnamed advisers told the news outlet that they hoped the president would back down from the threats over the Christmas holiday.

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Trump is expected to join his wife Melania TrumpMelania TrumpWhy we cherish — and guard — the White House gingerbread house The Hill's 12:30 Report: Job growth soars in November Impeachment hearing didn't go as Chairman Nadler planned MORE at his private Mar-a-Lago club in Florida at some point over the next week, though those plans were delayed Friday by congressional negotiations concerning the government shutdown.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill late Friday night on Bloomberg's report.

Powell publicly pushed back against the president earlier this month after Trump tweeted urging the Fed to resist raising interest rates, citing a stock market selloff.

“I know, and everyone who works at the Fed knows, that we’re going to do our jobs the way we’ve always done them,” Powell said at a press conference at the time.

Trump previously said in October that he would "maybe" regret selecting Powell to succeed the Federal Reserve's previous chairwoman, Janet YellenJanet Louise YellenWhat economic recession? Think of this economy as an elderly friend: Old age means coming death On The Money: Rising recession fears pose risk for Trump | Stocks suffer worst losses of 2019 | Trump blames 'clueless' Fed for economic worries MORE, who resigned in November 2017.