Business, conservative groups slam Trump’s national emergency declaration

Business and conservative groups typically aligned with the GOP came out strongly against President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrat calls on White House to withdraw ambassador to Belarus nominee TikTok collected data from mobile devices to track Android users: report Peterson wins Minnesota House primary in crucial swing district MORE’s decision to declare a national emergency over the border, underscoring opposition to the move from traditional Republican circles.

The opponents included the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, FreedomWorks and the Heritage Foundation, all of which warned that the decision could set a precedent for a liberal president to take actions opposed by businesses and conservatives.

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“The declaration of national emergency in this instance will create a dangerous precedent that erodes the very system of government that has served us so well for over 200 years," said Thomas J. Donohue, president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Trump declared the emergency after Congress refused to give him the $5.7 billion in funding he sought to build 234 miles of wall on the Mexican border. By declaring an emergency and using other executive actions, Trump plans to circumvent Congress and win as much as $8 billion in funds for the border, some of which would come from the Department of Defense.

Even before Trump announced his action, Republicans had warned such a tool could be used by a Democratic president to take action on health care or climate change.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiKamala Harris makes history — as a Westerner On The Money: McConnell says it's time to restart coronavirus talks | New report finds majority of Americans support merger moratorium | Corporate bankruptcies on pace for 10-year high McConnell: Time to restart coronavirus talks MORE (D-Calif.) said Thursday that Republicans should be worried that a future president would use Trump’s decision as precedent for declaring an emergency on gun control.

“A Democratic president can declare emergencies as well. So, the precedent that the President is setting here is something that should be met with great unease and dismay by the Republicans,” she said.

Democratic freshman Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOmar fends off primary challenge in Minnesota The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden picks Harris as running mate The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump to Democratic negotiators: 'They know my phone number' MORE (Minn.) went further. 

“Our next President should declare a #NationalEmergency on day 1 to address the existential threat to all life on the planet posed by Climate Change,” she tweeted.

Adam Brandon, president of FreedomWorks, warned the decision put too much power in the executive branch as opposed to Congress, which is supposed to have greater influence over spending.

“No matter whether a Republican or a Democrat sits in the Oval Office, the concentration of power in the executive branch is alarming,” he said.

Heritage Foundation President Kay Coles James said the move carried a “significant downside.”

“This creates a dangerous precedent for future administrations and exposes the critical need for border security to the whims of activist federal judges,” he said.

The Club for Growth, which has frequently supported conservative measures from the president and encouraged members of Congress to back them, remained silent on the issue.

The clash is the latest example of how Trump is challenging and changing the Republican Party, slaying some sacred cows of GOP orthodoxy while adhering tightly to others. 

Trump’s imposition of steep tariffs as part of a multi-pronged trade war has drawn rebukes from farmers, importers, manufacturers and retailers, as well as exporters hit with countermeasures from American trade partners. 

In the world of foreign policy, Trump’s isolationist leanings have drawn rebuke from security hawks and former generals.

The shift has repeatedly put congressional Republicans in a bind, forcing them to choose between the president and their party’s traditional policies.

Republicans from a variety of backgrounds have voiced opposition to the emergency declaration. 

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulWatchdog calls for probe into Gohmert 'disregarding public health guidance' on COVID-19 Massie plans to donate plasma after testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies After trillions in tax cuts for the rich, Republicans refuse to help struggling Americans MORE (R-Ky.), a libertarian, said the move could be unconstitutional. Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsProgressive Jewish group endorses Biden Poll: Gideon leads Collins by 8 points in Maine Senate race The Hill's 12:30 Report - Speculation over Biden's running mate announcement MORE (R-Maine), a moderate who is up for reelection in 2020, called it a “mistake.” 

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashKudlow acknowledges executive orders may end up in court: 'We're going to go ahead with our actions anyways' Several GOP lawmakers express concern over Trump executive orders Peter Meijer wins GOP primary in Amash's Michigan district MORE (R-Mich.), a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, said it was “attempting to circumvent the constitution” over a nonemergency. 

Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Speculation over Biden's running mate announcement Davis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump Lincoln Project expands GOP target list, winning Trump ire MORE (R-N.C.) painted a picture of how future Democratic presidents might use the same authority. He said that if he were elected to the Oval Office, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden wins Connecticut in final presidential primary of year Vermont Rep. Peter Welch easily wins primary Three pros and three cons to Biden picking Harris MORE (I-Vt.) could use an emergency declaration to shut down power plants as part of a Green New Deal.

“While I agree with President Trump's policy goal, I don't believe in situational principles, and it's clear what kind of rabbit hole our country can go down when we have a Democratic president who wants more government intrusion into our economy and our lives,” he said.