Klobuchar releases her tax returns

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharBiden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events There's a lot to like about the Senate privacy bill, if it's not watered down MORE (D-Minn.) on Monday posted 12 years of her tax returns to her campaign website, becoming the latest 2020 Democratic presidential candidate to make public at least a decade's worth of tax filings.

"Amy believes that transparency and accountability are fundamental to good governance," Klobuchar's website states. "That’s why she’s released her tax returns for every year since she’s been a candidate for federal office."

Klobuchar released her returns from 2006 — the year she was first elected to the Senate — through 2017. 

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Her website does not include her 2018 tax return, though it is unclear if she has filed it yet. Taxpayers have until April 15 to file their 2018 returns, or until Oct. 15 if they request an extension.

The 2017 tax return for Klobuchar and her husband, John Bessler, shows the couple had total income of $292,306 and paid $62,787 in taxes, for an effective tax rate of 21.5 percent. The couple's income mainly came from Klobuchar's Senate salary and Bessler's income as a lawyer and law professor.

The couple made $5,075 in charitable gifts, including donations to the American Red Cross, UNICEF, United Way and several universities.

Klobuchar is the latest presidential candidate to release at least 10 years of tax returns. Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandWhite House, Congress near deal to give 12 weeks paid parental leave to all federal workers Bloomberg on 2020 rivals blasting him for using his own money: 'They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money' Harris posts video asking baby if she'll run for president one day MORE (D-N.Y) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenArtist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE (D-Mass.) and Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeKrystal Ball: What Harris's exit means for the other 2020 candidates Bullock drops White House bid, won't run for Senate O'Rourke ends presidential bid MORE (D) have also done so.

In releasing their tax returns, the Democratic presidential candidates are highlighting their transparency, contrasting themselves with President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he will 'temporarily hold off' on declaring Mexican drug cartels as terror organization House Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Artist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 MORE, who in 2016 became the first major party nominee in decades to refuse to release his tax returns.