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Klobuchar releases her tax returns

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: YouTube suspends OANN amid lawmaker pressure | Dems probe Facebook, Twitter over Georgia runoff | FCC reaffirms ZTE's national security risk Democrats urge YouTube to remove election misinformation, step up efforts ahead of Georgia runoff YouTube temporarily suspends OANN account after spreading coronavirus misinformation MORE (D-Minn.) on Monday posted 12 years of her tax returns to her campaign website, becoming the latest 2020 Democratic presidential candidate to make public at least a decade's worth of tax filings.

"Amy believes that transparency and accountability are fundamental to good governance," Klobuchar's website states. "That’s why she’s released her tax returns for every year since she’s been a candidate for federal office."

Klobuchar released her returns from 2006 — the year she was first elected to the Senate — through 2017. 

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Her website does not include her 2018 tax return, though it is unclear if she has filed it yet. Taxpayers have until April 15 to file their 2018 returns, or until Oct. 15 if they request an extension.

The 2017 tax return for Klobuchar and her husband, John Bessler, shows the couple had total income of $292,306 and paid $62,787 in taxes, for an effective tax rate of 21.5 percent. The couple's income mainly came from Klobuchar's Senate salary and Bessler's income as a lawyer and law professor.

The couple made $5,075 in charitable gifts, including donations to the American Red Cross, UNICEF, United Way and several universities.

Klobuchar is the latest presidential candidate to release at least 10 years of tax returns. Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Social media responds to Harris making history: 'I feel like our ancestors are rejoicing' Ocasio-Cortez says she doesn't plan on 'staying in the House forever' MORE (D-N.Y) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenKamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year Mnuchin to put 5B in COVID-19 relief funds beyond successor's reach No, the government cannot seize, break or 'bypass' pharmaceutical patents — even for COVID-19 MORE (D-Mass.) and Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeWashington county warns of at least 17 positive tests after 300-person wedding The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by UAE - US records 1 million COVID-19 cases in a week; governors crack down Washington state issues sweeping restrictions to combat coronavirus surge MORE (D) have also done so.

In releasing their tax returns, the Democratic presidential candidates are highlighting their transparency, contrasting themselves with President TrumpDonald John TrumpUSAID administrator tests positive for COVID-19 Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year DOJ appeals ruling preventing it from replacing Trump in E. Jean Carroll defamation lawsuit MORE, who in 2016 became the first major party nominee in decades to refuse to release his tax returns.