Klobuchar releases her tax returns

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharHillicon Valley: Washington preps for Mueller report | Barr to hold Thursday presser | Lawmakers dive into AI ethics | FCC chair moves to block China Mobile | Dem bill targets 'digital divide' | Microsoft denies request for facial recognition tech Dems introduce bill to tackle 'digital divide' 20 Dems demand no more money for ICE agents, Trump wall MORE (D-Minn.) on Monday posted 12 years of her tax returns to her campaign website, becoming the latest 2020 Democratic presidential candidate to make public at least a decade's worth of tax filings.

"Amy believes that transparency and accountability are fundamental to good governance," Klobuchar's website states. "That’s why she’s released her tax returns for every year since she’s been a candidate for federal office."

Klobuchar released her returns from 2006 — the year she was first elected to the Senate — through 2017. 

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Her website does not include her 2018 tax return, though it is unclear if she has filed it yet. Taxpayers have until April 15 to file their 2018 returns, or until Oct. 15 if they request an extension.

The 2017 tax return for Klobuchar and her husband, John Bessler, shows the couple had total income of $292,306 and paid $62,787 in taxes, for an effective tax rate of 21.5 percent. The couple's income mainly came from Klobuchar's Senate salary and Bessler's income as a lawyer and law professor.

The couple made $5,075 in charitable gifts, including donations to the American Red Cross, UNICEF, United Way and several universities.

Klobuchar is the latest presidential candidate to release at least 10 years of tax returns. Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandOvernight Energy: Gillibrand offers bill to ban pesticide from school lunches | Interior secretary met tribal lawyer tied to Zinke casino dispute | Critics say EPA rule could reintroduce asbestos use Trump says he'd like to run against Buttigieg Gillibrand introduces bill to ban harmful pesticide from school lunch MORE (D-N.Y) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOvernight Defense: Reports detail effect of transgender military ban | Watchdog auditing 8 billion submarine program | Warren questions top general on climate change Booker calls for sweeping voting rights reforms Warren praises Ocasio-Cortez in Time 100 MORE (D-Mass.) and Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeInslee calls on DNC to hold debate focused on climate change Several 2020 Dems say they're ready to face Fox News town hall Inslee: Schultz 'almost totally' AWOL from policy in Washington state MORE (D) have also done so.

In releasing their tax returns, the Democratic presidential candidates are highlighting their transparency, contrasting themselves with President TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Dems demand Barr cancel 'inappropriate' press conference on Mueller report DOJ plans to release 'lightly redacted' version of Mueller report Thursday: WaPo Nadler accuses Barr of 'unprecedented steps' to 'spin' Mueller report MORE, who in 2016 became the first major party nominee in decades to refuse to release his tax returns.