SPONSORED:

Cain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed

Cain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed
© Greg Nash

Herman CainHerman CainRepublicans have dumped Reagan for Trump 'Trumpification' of the GOP will persist 'SNL' host Dave Chappelle urges Biden voters to be 'humble' winners MORE, who President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden prepares to confront Putin Biden aims to bolster troubled Turkey ties in first Erdoğan meeting Senate investigation of insurrection falls short MORE floated for a position on the Federal Reserve Board, said Wednesday he will continue to seek a spot at the central bank despite almost insurmountable Republican opposition.

Cain told The Wall Street Journal in a Wednesday interview that he will not withdraw from consideration for a nomination to the Fed board after GOP senators all but doomed his appointment.

ADVERTISEMENT

The 2012 GOP presidential candidate told the Journal he’s "very committed” to seeing the vetting process through after Trump announced earlier this month he intended to nominate Cain to the Fed if he passed a background check.

“The president asked me one simple question,” Cain told the Journal. “He said, ’Would you consider doing this if you make it through the process?’ I said 'yes.' Didn’t hesitate.”

Four of the Senate’s 53 Republicans announced last week that they would refuse to vote for Cain, a 2012 GOP presidential candidate, if he was formally nominated by Trump.

GOP Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPelosi: 'No intention' of abandoning Democrats' infrastructure goals What the Democrats should be doing to reach true bipartisanship Democrats mull overhaul of sweeping election bill MORE (Alaska), Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (Colo.), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyPelosi: 'No intention' of abandoning Democrats' infrastructure goals What the Democrats should be doing to reach true bipartisanship Eugene Goodman to throw out first pitch at Nationals game MORE (Utah) and Kevin CramerKevin John CramerTrump dismisses climate change, calls on Biden to fire joint chiefs Putin says Nord Stream 2 pipeline nearing completion Overnight Defense: Senate confirms Army secretary after snafu | Afghanistan withdrawal 'slightly' ahead of schedule MORE (N.D.) said they would not vote for Cain, and several others have expressed qualms with Cain's background and character.

Cain was accused by four women of sexual harassment while he led the National Restaurant Association, a Washington, D.C., trade group, between 1996 and 1998. He has denied all of the allegations but reached financial settlements with two of his accusers.

Republican senators also voiced concerns about Cain's close ties to Trump, fierce partisanship and leadership of a super PAC supporting the president's reelection.

If nominated, Cain would need the unlikely support of at least one Senate Democrat to be confirmed if all other Republicans voted for his nomination. Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinPelosi: 'No intention' of abandoning Democrats' infrastructure goals Ocasio-Cortez: 'Old way of politics' influences Manchin's thinking The Memo: Democratic tensions will only get worse as left loses patience MORE (D-W.Va.), who has bucked his party to support other Trump appointees, also said last week he wouldn't vote for Cain.

Larry KudlowLarry KudlowMORE, director of the White House National Economic Council, said Tuesday that the administration had been interviewing potential candidates to replace Cain and Stephen MooreStephen MooreFormer Trump economic adviser to Biden: 'Stop taxing. Stop spending. Stop borrowing.' trillion in taxes, trillion in spending, trillion in borrowing — what could go wrong? Why isn't Washington defending American companies from foreign assaults? MORE, who Trump also floated for a Fed seat.

“I think at the end of the day, it will probably be up to Herman Cain to stay in that process or not,” Kudlow said. “As far as we’re concerned, he’s still in that process and it’s proceeding in an orderly way."

Cain told the Journal that “What Kudlow was doing was giving me an out, and I appreciate that, but I don’t want an out.”

“You know that the president is a fighter, and Kudlow is a fighter. They might be getting a lot of blowback from some folks, I don’t know. But I don’t think they’re getting uncomfortable with it,” Cain added.

Updated at 4:12 p.m.