Target expands parental leave, other child care benefits for workers

Target expands parental leave, other child care benefits for workers
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Months after Target pledged to raise its hourly minimum wage for workers to $15, the top retailer said Monday that it would be expanding its paid parental leave and other child care benefits for its part-time and salaried employees. 

One of the benefits the company said it would be expanding for workers is its affordable backup care program.

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“Picture this: You’re about to leave for work, but suddenly, school or daycare is closed, a sitter or eldercare provider gets sick,” the company said. “With our new backup care benefit, team members can rest assured that their loved ones have safe, affordable, reliable care while they’re at work.” 

“Beginning this fall, Target will extend affordable backup care solutions to our hourly and salaried team members at all stores and distribution centers—a program we initially rolled out at our headquarters,” it continued. The company said workers will be provided with 20 days of “in-center childcare or in-home child- and eldercare” under the program.

The company also said in the announcement that it will be introducing new paid family leave to employees.

“When a team member needs some extended time off to support their family—whether it’s welcoming a new baby, adopting a child or caring for a partner or ailing parent—they can turn to our new paid family leave policy,” the company said. “This new benefit, starting June 30, gives hourly and salaried team members, including part-time employees, the flexibility to care for their families.”

Under the sweeping changes to its policies, the company said employees welcoming a new child will also “receive double the amount of paid time off to care for their newest family member,” which is “on top of the medical leave a team member receives after giving birth to a baby.”

The company also vowed to double adoption and surrogacy reimbursement for workers.

“Families welcoming children through adoption or surrogacy can face long, complex processes that come with many high costs,” the company said. “To give them some relief, we recently doubled the amount we’ll reimburse team members’ adoption or surrogacy fees. We’ve offered this benefit for more than 10 years, providing our hourly and salaried team members with financial support so they can focus on growing their families.”

Back in April, Target increased its minimum wage for workers from $12 to $13 an hour. The raise came as part of the company’s broader pledge to increase minimum wage for its workers to $15 by the end of 2020.