Congressional leaders, White House officials to meet Wednesday on spending

Congressional leaders, White House officials to meet Wednesday on spending
© Greg Nash

Republican and Democratic leaders in Congress will meet Wednesday with senior White House officials in another attempt to reach a deal on raising spending caps and the federal debt ceiling.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyThe Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants GOP wants commitment that Trump will sign budget deal Schumer warns Mulvaney against drawing hard lines on budget deal MORE (R-Ala.) said Tuesday that he and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell challenger faces tougher path after rocky launch Funding a strong defense of our nation's democratic process can't wait The Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants MORE (R-Ky.) will meet with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats should rise above and unify against Trump's tweets 10 questions for Robert Mueller Ocasio-Cortez tears into Trump's immigration agenda: 'It's about ethnicity and racism' MORE (D-Calif.) Wednesday afternoon.

ADVERTISEMENT

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDem senator describes 'overcrowded quarters,' 'harsh odor' at border facilities Top Democrats demand security assessment of Trump properties Lawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens MORE (D-N.Y.), House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyThe Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants History in the House: Congress weathers unprecedented week EU official in Canada says he feels 'at home' there because no one was shouting 'send him back' MORE (R-Calif.) and the top Republicans and Democrats from the Appropriations committees — Shelby, Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Democrats grill USDA official on relocation plans that gut research staff Lawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens MORE (D-Vt.), Rep. Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment House votes to kill impeachment effort against Trump Hillicon Valley: Trump officials to investigate French tax on tech giants | Fed chair raises concerns about Facebook's crypto project | FCC blocks part of San Francisco law on broadband competition | House members warn of disinformation 'battle' MORE (D-N.Y.) and Rep. Kay GrangerNorvell (Kay) Kay GrangerLobbying world House approves bill increasing federal worker pay House approves 3 billion spending package MORE (R-Texas) — will also attend, according to a congressional aide briefed on the meeting.

Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinBudget talks between White House, Pelosi spill into weekend Conservative group raises concerns about potential budget deal How China's currency manipulation cheats America on trade MORE, acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyTrump telling aides to look at potential spending cuts if he wins reelection: report Budget talks between White House, Pelosi spill into weekend Trump says Democrats shouldn't use debt ceiling as leverage MORE and Office of Management and Budget acting Director Russ Vought will represent the administration.

The meeting follows a phone conversation Shelby had with Pelosi on Saturday on how to move the stalled talks forward.

“We’re going to meet tomorrow afternoon with Pelosi, I guess in the Speaker’s office. I got a notice an hour or so ago,” Shelby said Tuesday. “We’re having positive discussions."

Congressional leaders and senior administration officials announced progress when they met shortly before the Memorial Day recess.

Mnuchin said last week that the White House now supports combining a spending deal with legislation to raise the debt limit.

One outstanding difference between congressional leaders and the White House is over whether to raise statutory spending caps for the next two fiscal years or just for 2020.

The White House has indicated it would prefer a shorter deal that's likely to have a smaller impact on the federal deficit.