Trump says he is planning a 'very substantial' middle class tax cut in next year

President TrumpDonald John TrumpRussian sanctions will boomerang States, cities rethink tax incentives after Amazon HQ2 backlash A Presidents Day perspective on the nature of a free press MORE on Thursday said that he planned to announce a middle class tax cut in the next year.

“It will be a very substantial tax cut for middle income folks who work so hard,” Trump said at a retreat with House Republicans in Baltimore.

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He added that the tax cut would be “very, very inspirational” but did not provide additional details.

The comments come a day after the White House said that the president would not reduce capital gains taxes "at this time."

“President Trump was thoroughly briefed on the complex economic, legal and regulatory issues, and concluded that at this time he does not feel enough of the benefits will go to the middle class,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said Wednesday. 

The president has previously sent mixed messages on the issue. 

He said last month that he was also looking into a temporary payroll tax cut

Trump last month said in a tweet that he would approve a "major middle income tax cut" if Republicans keep the Senate and presidency and take back the House in next year's elections.

He also did not elaborate on this proposal, which came days after adviser Larry Kudlow said Thursday that the administration was looking at a "tax cuts 2.0" package for long-term improvement but not near-term cuts. 

Ahead of last year's midterm elections, Trump suggested to reporters that his administration was working on a middle class tax cut. But lawmakers said they were unaware of such an effort, and no such bill ever came to fruition.

Any tax proposal from the White House would face an uphill battle in Congress with the Democratically controlled House.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiMalaysia says it will choose 5G partners based on own standards, not US recommendations Pelosi warns allies against using Huawei Budget hawks frustrated by 2020 politics in entitlement reform fight MORE (D-Calif.) has indicated that she would be open to middle-class tax cuts, but only if they are offset by taxes on the wealthy, according to Bloomberg. 

Updated at 12:55 p.m.