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Mnuchin: White House has no intention for a shutdown

Mnuchin: White House has no intention for a shutdown
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The administration is not planning to shut down the government as negotiations over funding President TrumpDonald John TrumpNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter DC correspondent on the death of Michael Reinoehl: 'The folks I know in law enforcement are extremely angry about it' Late night hosts targeted Trump over Biden 97 percent of the time in September: study MORE’s border wall rush toward a Nov. 21 deadline, said Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinGOP blocks Schumer effort to adjourn Senate until after election GOP noncommittal about vote on potential Trump-Pelosi coronavirus deal On The Money: Sides tiptoe towards a COVID deal, but breakthrough appears distant | Expiring benefits raise stakes of stimulus talks | Stocks fade with eyes on Capitol MORE.
 
“We have no intention of having a shutdown. I think everybody intends to keep the government open,” Mnuchin said following a meeting with House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiGOP blocks Schumer effort to adjourn Senate until after election GOP noncommittal about vote on potential Trump-Pelosi coronavirus deal Overnight Health Care: Trump takes criticism of Fauci to a new level | GOP Health Committee chairman defends Fauci | Birx confronted Pence about Atlas MORE (D-Calif.) and the top congressional appropriators from both chambers. 
 
Wall funding has become the central obstacle for passing bills to fund the government and avoid a shutdown. 
 
Last year, the same issue led to a 35-day shutdown, the longest in the nation's history. Trump has been seen as the wild card in the negotiations, and Mnuchin’s participation in Thursday’s meeting and insistence that a shutdown is not in the books raises the chances of things going smoothly. 
 
Negotiators in the meeting agreed to find a solution on how to allocate funds between the government’s agencies by Wednesday. 
 
Democrats have objected to drawing funds from health-related bills to fund the wall in the Homeland Security bill. 
 
But negotiators now seem intent to strike a deal on the allocations and work out details on the wall and other disagreements later. 
 
Next week, the House is set to vote on a four-week stopgap measure to avert a shutdown and postpone the deadline for passing full funding measures until just before the Christmas holiday. 
 
Jordain Carney contributed