Senate approves Trump trade deal with Canada, Mexico

The Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill to implement President TrumpDonald John TrumpWith VP pick, Biden can't play small ball in a long ball world Coronavirus hits defense contractor jobs Wake up America, your country doesn't value your life MORE’s proposed update to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) after a mad dash to clear the measure before impeachment proceedings paralyze the chamber. 

Senators voted 89-10 to pass a bill ratifying Trump’s U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), sending the measure to the president for his final sign-off. USMCA’s passage marks another milestone for Trump just one day after he cemented a preliminary trade deal with China.

“Today the Senate will send this landmark agreement to the president’s desk,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellCoronavirus pushes GOP's Biden-Burisma probe to back burner Struggling states warn coronavirus stimulus falls short Hillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike MORE (R-Ky.) ahead of the vote. “Quite a week of substantive accomplishments for the nation, for the president, and for international trade."

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All but one Republican and nine Democrats voted to approve USMCA. Democrats who voted against the agreement cited insufficient improvements to environmental standards.

“Despite the fact that it includes very good labor provisions, I am voting against USMCA because it does not address climate change, the greatest threat facing our planet,” said Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTexas man arrested for allegedly threatening Democrats over coronavirus bill Pelosi not invited by Trump to White House coronavirus relief bill's signing COVID-19, Bill Barr and the American authoritarian tradition MORE (D-N.Y.). 

Trump is expected to sign the deal within days, though it will not take effect until Canada ratifies the agreement. The government of Mexico approved the deal last year and amended its labor laws to comply with stricter standards included in USMCA.

The Senate’s approval of USMCA checks off a key promise of Trump’s 2016 campaign that could help strengthen the president’s electoral prospects. 

Trump’s pledge to rip up NAFTA was crucial to his appeal in industrial states that lost thousands of jobs to Mexico under the 1994 pact. While USMCA is more of an update to NAFTA than a replacement, the still deal gives Trump an achievement to tout in Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin — four swing states that could make or break his reelection.

“I think there was a lot of skepticism, frankly, that we could come up with either one of these agreements,” said Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenators pen op-ed calling for remote voting amid coronavirus pandemic Some Democrats growing antsy as Senate talks drag on Coronavirus stimulus talks hit setback as crisis deepens MORE (R-Ohio) in a CNBC interview on Wednesday.

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“We have done both of them, and shown that once again America can be out there helping to level the playing field and create a better environment for our workers and our farmers and get some deals done.”

USMCA’s passage may also serve as the high-water mark of bipartisanship for Washington, and just days before the Senate begins Trump’s impeachment trial.

Many Democrats shared Trump’s skepticism of NAFTA and were eager to team with the president to revise the deal even as they sought to remove him from office. Trump also needed to secure enough Democratic support to clear USMCA through the House, where the GOP holds a minority.

House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSunday shows preview: Lawmakers, state governors talk coronavirus, stimulus package and resources as pandemic rages on Attacking the Affordable Care Act in the time of COVID-19 DC argues it is shortchanged by coronavirus relief bill MORE (D-Calif.) and a team of Democratic negotiators secured major victories for the party in negotiations with Trump, including tougher labor, environmental and pharmaceutical standards. 

Those changes helped win over some labor unions and Democrats fiercely opposed to free trade deals, including Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownAmazon doubling overtime pay for warehouse workers Democrats grow nervous over primary delays Hillicon Valley: Senators press Amazon over workplace safety amid outbreak | Lyft expands to deliveries | Dems seek election security funds in stimulus package MORE (D-Ohio), who has voted against every trade deal considered by Congress since 1993. 

“[Trump’s] first NAFTA draft was nowhere near the good deal that the president promised. He had negotiated, pure and simple, another corporate trade deal that meant nothing for workers,” Brown said Wednesday in remarks on the Senate floor.

But the new version of USMCA incorporated language from a bill offered by Brown and Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Senate Democrats vow to keep pushing for more funds for mail-in voting Hillicon Valley: Coronavirus deal includes funds for mail-in voting | Twitter pulled into fight over virus disinformation | State AGs target price gouging | Apple to donate 10M masks MORE (D-Ore.) to ensure foreign factories comply with labor standards under trade agreements, clinching his support.

“The president resisted, and resisted, and resisted, but we finally approved a deal to put workers at the center of our trade policy,” Brown said. 

The endorsements of Brown and a slew of powerful labor groups, including the AFL-CIO, helped rally progressive Democrats behind the deal. The House approved USMCA on Dec. 19 by a vote of 385-41, just one day after approving two articles of impeachment against Trump.

Even some of Trump’s 2020 Democratic challengers, including Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Democratic Senators urge FTC to prevent coronavirus price gouging Democratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men MORE (Mass.), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharWith VP pick, Biden can't play small ball in a long ball world Hillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Democratic Senators urge FTC to prevent coronavirus price gouging MORE (Minn.), and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetHillicon Valley: Facebook launches portal for coronavirus information | EU sees spike in Russian misinformation on outbreak | Senate Dem bill would encourage mail-in voting | Lawmakers question safety of Google virus website We need a massive economic response to counter the threat of the coronavirus Senator calls for cybersecurity review at health agencies after hacking incident MORE (Colo.), voted for USMCA as a step to reduce the harm of NAFTA.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersWith VP pick, Biden can't play small ball in a long ball world Poll: Trump, Biden in dead heat in 2020 matchup Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers, state governors talk coronavirus, stimulus package and resources as pandemic rages on MORE (I-Vt.) was the sole Democratic presidential candidate to vote against USMCA, calling on Trump to "fundamentally rewrite" the 1994 agreement. 

The rush of Democratic support for Trump’s marquee trade deal guaranteed USMCA’s easy passage, but also frustrated Senate Republicans who largely favored NAFTA. Several GOP senators said they felt taken for granted as the White House bent over backwards to secure Democratic votes.

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Republican critics of the deal complained that USMCA was rushed through the Senate less than a month after the White House unveiled changes to the agreement. 

“It's very, very important to me that we insist that that delegated authority be exercised properly and the legislation that follows from it complies with the law,” said Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyNSA improperly collected US phone records in October, new documents show Overnight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns MORE (R-Pa.), who voted against the deal.

Despite their ideological differences over trade, few GOP senators were expected to buck Trump on a marquee issue. The president had also warned he would pull out of NAFTA altogether if Congress did not approve his replacement, threatening to unleash an economic calamity if lawmakers rebuked him.

Several also highlighted provisions in USMCA to reduce barriers for U.S. crop and dairy sales to Canada and Mexico, a victory for the agriculture industry.

“While not perfect, this deal represents a long overdue update to NAFTA, and overall will benefit workers and farmers in our state and across the country,” said Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt Romney7 things to know about the coronavirus stimulus package Scarborough rips Trump for mocking Romney's negative coronavirus test: 'Could have been a death sentence' Trump on Romney's negative coronavirus test: 'I am so happy I can barely speak' MORE (R-Utah), touting the deal’s benefits for dairy farmers.

Trump has sought to make the strong economy and recent successes in trade talks a focal point of his campaign for a second term. The president is counting on a solid economic record to quash concerns about his conduct, character and rhetoric that could cost him swing voters.

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Senators raced to approve USMCA before Trump’s impeachment trial, which would have blocked the chamber from voting on any other legislation. 

The confluence of the House’s votes to impeach Trump and approve his most significant trade accomplishment threw USMCA’s future in doubt. A surprise ruling from the Senate parliamentarian set off a mad dash to approve USMCA in six committees other than the Finance panel, which has jurisdiction over trade. 

But Pelosi’s initial refusal to send articles of impeachment to the Senate gave the upper chamber enough time to clear USMCA before Trump’s trial begins. The Senate is expected to swear in senators and initiate Trump's trial Tuesday.

--Updated at 1:27 p.m.