Here are the 10 senators who voted against Trump's North American trade deal

The Senate overwhelmingly passed President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeSantis on Florida schools reopening: 'If you can do Walmart,' then 'we absolutely can do schools' NYT editorial board calls for the reopening of schools with help from federal government's 'checkbook' Mueller pens WaPo op-ed: Roger Stone 'remains a convicted felon, and rightly so' MORE’s proposed replacement for the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) on Thursday, sending the deal to the president’s desk for his approval.

Passage of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) represents a rare moment of bipartisanship in a bitterly divided Congress. The deal cleared the Senate by a vote of 89 to 10 on Thursday, close to a month after passing the House by a vote of 385-41.

Republicans were eager to help Trump accomplish a major pillar of his economic agenda despite their preferences for a deal with looser restrictions. Democrats, who broadly shared Trump’s scorn for NAFTA, were eager to revise the deal to enhance labor standard enforcement and scrap protections for high-cost pharmaceuticals.

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Even so, nine Democrats opposed the USMCA largely due to environmental concerns, while one Republican rejected the agreement over concerns it would burden international trade.

 

Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyGOP senators push for quick, partial reopening of economy NSA improperly collected US phone records in October, new documents show Overnight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general MORE (R-Pa.)

Toomey was the sole Republican to vote against the USMCA despite its importance to the president’s agenda and Trump’s reliance on Pennsylvania in the upcoming November election.

A staunch conservative and opponent of Trump’s trade agenda, Toomey argued that provisions meant to boost wages in Mexico and raise the tariff-free threshold for autos would spike prices for American consumers.

“Outside of a few necessary modernizations and modest market access improvements for Pennsylvania's dairy farmers, USMCA is a step backwards and I could not support its passage,” Toomey said in a Thursday statement.

 

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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden wins Louisiana primary Oh, Canada: Should the US emulate Canada's National Health Service? Trump glosses over virus surge during Florida trip MORE (I-Vt.)

Sanders, a fierce critic of trade deals, was the sole 2020 Democratic presidential candidate to oppose the USMCA. While the White House won over some trade hawks with stronger environmental standards, Sanders said the deal fell short of the transformational change needed to protect American workers.

“We need to fundamentally rewrite our disastrous trade agreements and create and protect good-paying American jobs,” Sanders said Wednesday in remarks on the Senate floor.

“This agreement does virtually nothing to stop the outsourcing of jobs to Mexico.”

 

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerDemocrats blast Trump for commuting Roger Stone: 'The most corrupt president in history' A renewed emphasis on research and development funding is needed from the government Data shows seven Senate Democrats have majority non-white staffs MORE (D-N.Y.)

Like many progressive Democrats, Schumer praised the USMCA for including unprecedented labor standards and compliance checks to protect U.S. factory jobs. But the Senate minority leader opposed the deal over a lack of provisions intended to fight climate change.

“Instead of advancing global climate security by outlining binding and enforceable climate commitments from all three countries, the Trump administration provides significant incentives for manufacturers to move their business and their jobs from the U.S. to Mexico, where clean air and clean water regulations are much weaker," Schumer said.

 

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocrats seek to tie GOP candidates to Trump, DeVos Democratic lawmakers call for expanding, enshrining LGBTQ rights The Hill's 12:30 Report: Fauci 'aspirationally hopeful' of a vaccine by winter MORE (D-N.Y.)

Gillibrand, who briefly ran for president last year, did not share Schumer’s praise for the deal’s new labor provisions.

“Bad trade deals, including NAFTA, hollowed out upstate New York’s manufacturing industry,” Gillibrand said in a statement Thursday. “I don’t believe this agreement will reverse this trend or help the generations of New Yorkers who lost good jobs."

Gillibrand also opposed the deal because it “fails to close loopholes for corporate polluters or set binding, enforceable standards to protect clean air and water.”

 

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Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDemocrats blast Trump for commuting Roger Stone: 'The most corrupt president in history' Koch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads Data shows seven Senate Democrats have majority non-white staffs MORE (D-N.J.)

Booker, who suspended his presidential campaign this week, was among the few Trump challengers to oppose the USMCA after it passed the House. The senator said the USMCA did little to halt outsourcing, protect the environment or support middle- and working-class wages.

“USMCA does not meaningfully address any of these issues: jobs will continue to be outsourced, the environment will continue to be under attack, and middle class and working families will continue to be left behind,” he said in a Thursday statement.

 

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHillicon Valley: Facebook considers political ad ban | Senators raise concerns over civil rights audit | Amazon reverses on telling workers to delete TikTok Senators raise concerns over Facebook's civil rights audit Biden's marijuana plan is out of step with public opinion MORE (D-Calif)

Harris, who had also sought the Democratic presidential nomination, voted against the deal over environmental concerns.

“By not addressing climate change, the USMCA fails to meet the crises of this moment,” Harris said in a Tuesday statement.

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Sen. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyGOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday The Hill's Campaign Report: Jacksonville mandates face coverings as GOP convention approaches Steyer endorses Markey in Massachusetts Senate primary MORE (D-Mass.) 

Markey is the original Senate sponsor of the Green New Deal, an ambitious program spearheaded by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezGoya CEO dismisses critics for praise of Trump: 'I'm not apologizing' Trump tweets his support for Goya Foods amid boycott Hispanic Caucus requests meeting with private detention center CEOs MORE (D-N.Y.) to transform the U.S. economy to fight climate change. 

The senator said Tuesday he would vote against the USMCA, calling the deal “a profound environmental and climate failure” that will “hinder progress on climate action for a generation.”

 

Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseDemocrat asks Barr to preserve any records tied to environmental hacking probe Democrats warn Biden against releasing SCOTUS list Key Democrat accuses Labor head of 'misleading' testimony on jobless benefits MORE (D-R.I.)

Whitehouse is an ardent environmentalist who delivers a weekly address on the Senate floor chronicling the damage of climate change. He also opposed the USMCA over the issue. 

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Sen. Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedData shows seven Senate Democrats have majority non-white staffs Sunday shows - FDA commissioner declines to confirm Trump claim that 99 percent of COVID-19 cases are 'harmless' Senate Democrat: Russian bounties intel 'the type of information that has to be seized by the president' MORE (D-R.I.)

Reed voted against the original NAFTA agreement and voted against the USMCA because it fails to fix the problems of the original pact, said spokesman Chip Unruh.

“It still fails to provide adequately for Rhode Island’s workers and is a missed opportunity to address climate change and environmental protections in a meaningful way. Just like the old NAFTA, he cannot support this new one,” Unruh said.

Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzCensus workers prepare to go door-knocking in pandemic Data shows seven Senate Democrats have majority non-white staffs Overnight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police MORE (D-Hawaii)

Schatz has advocated for Congress and federal regulators to impose greater requirements on corporations to fight and identify climate risks. His office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.