Democrat hits Mnuchin for giving Hunter Biden docs to Republicans

Rep. Bill PascrellWilliam (Bill) James PascrellProgressive poll finds support for solar energy tax credit legislation Democrats brace for toughest stretch yet with Biden agenda LIVE COVERAGE: Tax hikes take center stage in Ways and Means markup MORE (D-N.J.) is criticizing the Treasury Department for providing Republican senators with financial records as part of their probe concerning Hunter Biden.

Pascrell, a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, blasted the department for turning over the documents while at the same time refusing to provide House Democrats with President TrumpDonald TrumpOvernight Defense & National Security — Presented by Boeing — Milley warns of 'Sputnik moment' for China WSJ publishes letter from Trump continuing to allege voter fraud in PA Oath Keeper who was at Capitol on Jan. 6 runs for New Jersey State Assembly MORE's tax returns.

"Continuing to violate the law to shield Donald Trump’s tax returns while simultaneously aiding a blatantly partisan investigation is an affront to public service," Pascrell wrote in a letter dated Thursday to Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven MnuchinMajor Russian hacking group linked to ransomware attack on Sinclair: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Biden jumps into frenzied Dem spending talks Former Treasury secretaries tried to resolve debt limit impasse in talks with McConnell, Yellen: report MORE.

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Pascrell's letter comes after a spokeswoman for Senate Finance Committee ranking member Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOn The Money — Will the billionaire tax survive Joe Manchin? Patience wears thin as Democrats miss deadlines Crucial talks on Biden agenda enter homestretch MORE (D-Ore.) said Thursday that the Treasury Department is complying with a request for documents from two Senate GOP chairmen.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyBipartisan lawmakers target judges' stock trading with new bill Another voice of reason retires Overnight Health Care — Presented by Carequest — FDA moves to sell hearing aids over-the-counter MORE (R-Iowa) and Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee Chairman Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonA pandemic of hyper-hypocrisy is infecting American politics Sen. Ron Johnson hoping for Democratic 'gridlock' on reconciliation package Republicans' mantra should have been 'Stop the Spread' MORE (R-Wis.) sent a letter to Treasury in November as part of an investigation into "potentially improper actions by the Obama administration" concerning Ukraine and Burisma Holdings, a Ukrainian gas company where Hunter Biden, the son of former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden to meet House Dems before Europe trip: report 21 House Democrats call for removing IRS bank reporting proposal from spending bill Overnight Health Care — Presented by Altria — Vulnerable House Dems push drug pricing plan MORE, worked.

The two senators sought any "suspicious activity reports" and related documents about Burisma, Hunter Biden and others from the Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN). Financial institutions file suspicious activity reports with FinCEN about actions that might signal criminal activity in an effort to help the federal government detect and prevent money laundering.

A Treasury official did not comment specifically on the request from Grassley and Johnson but said the department responds to congressional requests for information, including information from FinCEN, from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle.

Democrats argue that the Trump administration has stonewalled their requests for information.

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Last spring, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard NealRichard Edmund NealTrump lawyers ask judge to block IRS from giving his tax returns to congressional panel Manchin dampens progressive hopes for billionaires tax 535 'presidents' with veto power: Why budget deal remains elusive MORE (D-Mass.) sent requests and subpoenas to the Treasury Department and the IRS for six years of Trump's federal tax returns, saying his committee was conducting oversight and considering legislative proposals about how the IRS audits presidents.

Neal cited a section of the federal tax code that states that the Treasury secretary "shall furnish" tax returns requested by the chairs of Congress's tax committees.

The Trump administration rejected Neal's requests and subpoenas, arguing they lacked a "legitimate legislative purpose" and that Democrats' true objective in seeking the tax returns was to make public the tax information of a political rival. The dispute has yet to be resolved in the courts.

Pascrell said in Thursday's letter that Mnuchin's participation in the Senate GOP probe "is unacceptable, but made far worse when compared beside your adamant refusal to obey the law ... by providing Donald Trump’s tax returns to the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee pursuant to his request of April 3, 2019."

The New Jersey Democrat called on Mnuchin to end his "stonewalling and give the Ways and Means Committee its requested information." He also asked Mnuchin to provide information about any Biden financial records that the Treasury Department has given to the Senate and what legitimate legislative purpose is fulfilled by complying with the GOP request.

A source familiar with the two congressional requests said there are a number of differences between them, including that Republicans aren't seeking information on tax returns.