SPONSORED:

Sanders says NH Democratic senators were wrong to back Trump's USMCA

Sanders says NH Democratic senators were wrong to back Trump's USMCA
© Getty

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's Morning Report - ObamaCare here to stay Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle OVERNIGHT ENERGY:  EPA announces new clean air advisors after firing Trump appointees |  Senate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior | Watchdog: Bureau of Land Management saw messaging failures, understaffing during pandemic MORE (I-Vt.) said during Friday night's presidential debate in New Hampshire that the state's two Democratic senators — Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanCentrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle The Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? Tensions grow between liberals and centrists on infrastructure MORE and Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenCentrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle Tensions grow between liberals and centrists on infrastructure Cosmetic chemicals need a makeover MORE — were wrong to vote for President TrumpDonald TrumpWhite House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine Poll: 30 percent of GOP voters believe Trump will 'likely' be reinstated this year Black Secret Service agent told Trump it was offensive to hold rally in Tulsa on Juneteenth: report MORE's new trade agreement with Canada and Mexico.

"Yes," Sanders said when asked directly if Hassan and Shaheen were incorrect in voting for the deal. "I mean, it's a disagreement."

"There is not one word in that trade agreement that deals with climate change, and I don't know how in 2020 you could do that," Sanders said.

ADVERTISEMENT

He went on to argue that the agreement, known as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), would lead to continued outsourcing of American jobs to Mexico.

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDemocrats scramble to unify before election bill brawl Hillicon Valley: Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC | Lawmakers urge Biden to be tough on cyber during summit with Putin | TSA working on additional security regulations following Colonial Pipeline hack Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC MORE (D-Minn.), who voted for the USMCA, said she wanted to "defend the honor of the incredible two senators from New Hampshire."

She said there were "major improvements" in the trade agreement pertaining to labor inspections.

Klobuchar said she would work to make sure that climate change provisions are included in future trade deals and that the best ways to tackle the issue are to reenter the Paris climate agreement, restore former President Obama's clean power rules and put a price on carbon. She argued that having no trade agreement with Canada and Mexico would put the U.S. at a disadvantage when trying to "pushing China to do better when it comes to climate change."

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenDemocrats have turned solidly against gas tax Overnight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 Democratic senators press PhRMA over COVID-19 lobbying efforts  MORE (D-Mass.) also explained her vote in favor of Trump's North American trade deal, saying Democrats helped to improve the agreement and that it "makes things somewhat better for workers and for farmers."

ADVERTISEMENT

"When I see a law that makes things somewhat better for hardworking people in this country, I say, 'I'll sign up for that.' And then I'll get up tomorrow morning and I'll start working hard for a better trade deal on climate," Warren said.

Another candidate, Tom SteyerTom SteyerTop 12 political donors accounted for almost 1 of every 13 dollars raised since 2009: study California Democrats weigh their recall options Why we should be leery of companies entering political fray MORE, said he agreed with Sanders on the USMCA.

"Everybody wants to get into our market, and that's how we convince them that they've got to be right on climate too," Steyer said.