28 percent of Americans say they've already lost wages due to coronavirus: poll

28 percent of Americans say they've already lost wages due to coronavirus: poll
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More than a quarter of Americans say they’ve already lost wages as the economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic broadens, according to a new Grinnell College poll released Wednesday. 

Twenty-eight percent of those surveyed said they’d already “lost wages or other personal income.” Another 16 percent said they were laid off or furloughed from work, and an additional 28 percent said they lost what they considered a “substantial amount” from a retirement account.

The poll comes as more and more states issue an array of orders shuttering nonessential businesses, leading to a spike in layoffs particularly in industries like bars and restaurants, retail and more. More than 3 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits between March 15 and March 22, a spike from the 281,000 applications for jobless benefits filed between March 8 and 14. 

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However, a substantial majority of those polled still said they would be willing to stay home indefinitely to try to blunt the spread of the coronavirus, which has infected nearly 190,000 Americans and killed more than 4,000.

Seventy percent of adults said they would be willing to stay at home for “as long as asked,” while only 4 percent said they would not comply with a stay-at-home order for any amount of time.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpWhite House sued over lack of sign language interpreters at coronavirus briefings Wife blames Trump, lack of masks for husband's coronavirus death in obit: 'May Karma find you all' Trump authorizes reduced funding for National Guard coronavirus response through 2020 MORE has extended guidelines for social distancing in place through the end of April to try to blunt the spread of the coronavirus, and several of the states’ stay-at-home orders extend through at least the end of the month.

The Grinnell College poll, which was conducted by Selzer & Co., surveyed 1,009 adults from March 27 to 30 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points.