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Tanden withdraws nomination as Biden budget chief

Neera TandenNeera TandenFive ways an obscure Senate ruling could change Washington 2024 GOP White House hopefuls lead opposition to Biden Cabinet White House delays release of budget plan MORE has withdrawn her nomination to head President BidenJoe BidenObama, Clinton reflect on Mondale's legacy Biden, Harris commend Mondale in paving the way for female VP Mondale in last message to staff: 'Joe in the White House certainly helps' MORE's White House budget office after her prospects of Senate confirmation flamed out.

The White House made the announcement on Tuesday evening, capping a tumultuous few weeks surrounding the fight over her nomination.

Tanden, who would have been the first woman of color to lead the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), faced scrutiny over mean tweets she had written about Republicans and progressive Democrats alike in her previous role heading the Center for American Progress think tank.

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“I have accepted Neera Tanden’s request to withdraw her name from nomination for Director of the Office of Management and Budget,” Biden said in a statement. “I have the utmost respect for her record of accomplishment, her experience and her counsel, and I look forward to having her serve in a role in my Administration. She will bring valuable perspective and insight to our work.”

Tanden is Biden's first Cabinet nominee to be withdrawn from consideration, making this an early blow for the president. The White House spent the past two weeks insisting there was a path to confirmation for Tanden and vowed to fight for her, even as her prospects dimmed.

Tanden is expected to be appointed to an administration role that does not require Senate confirmation.

A handful of names have circulated as potential replacements for Tanden. Shalanda Young, who on Wednesday underwent a confirmation hearing to be the deputy OMB director, is seen as the most likely nominee.

In her controversial tweets, many of which were deleted in recent months, Tanden compared Sen. Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHouse votes to condemn Chinese government over Hong Kong 15 Senate Republicans pledge to oppose lifting earmark ban It's not 'woketivism,' it's good business MORE (R-Ky.) to Voldemort and Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward Cruz15 Senate Republicans pledge to oppose lifting earmark ban 'Real Housewives of the GOP' — Wannabe reality show narcissists commandeer the party Is the antidote to bad speech more speech or more regulation? MORE (R-Texas) to a vampire and insinuated that Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOvernight Energy: Treasury creates hub to fight climate change through finance | Sanders, Ocasio-Cortez introduce 'Green New Deal for Public Housing' | Don't attack Zoom for its Bernie Sanders federal tax bill Sanders, Ocasio-Cortez introduce 'Green New Deal for Public Housing' MORE (I-Vt.) benefited from Russian hacking in the 2016 election.

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In two confirmation hearings, she repeatedly apologized for the tweets and promised to strike a more collegial tone as a member of the administration.

Her nomination began to unravel when Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinOn The Money: Treasury creates hub to fight climate change | Manchin throws support behind union-backed PRO Act | Consumer bureau rolls out rule to bolster CDC eviction ban Miners union to back Biden on green energy if it retains jobs Manchin throws support behind union-backed PRO Act MORE (D-W.V.) pulled his support, citing the need for comity. In the evenly divided Senate, that left Tanden reliant on support from centrist Republicans such as Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate aims to pass anti-Asian hate crimes bill this week This week: Democrats move on DC statehood Trump looms over Senate's anti-Asian hate crimes battle MORE (Maine), who also was a target of Tanden's tweets. That support was not forthcoming.

Tanden met with Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump: GOP candidates need to embrace 'make America great' agenda if they want to win Republicans who backed Trump impeachment see fundraising boost Moderates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats MORE (R-Alaska) this week in a last-ditch bid by the White House to attract Republican support for her nomination that would be necessary to overcome Manchin’s "no" vote.

Murkowski seemed surprised by the news and said Tuesday evening that she had not yet made up her mind about whether to support Tanden. The White House, she said, had not consulted her before pulling the nomination.

"They never asked," she said.

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"Now, it means that I'm going to have to do the Alaska tutorial 101 all over again with whoever it is that they name," she said, referring to her Monday meeting with Tanden.

Sanders and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) also had not definitively said how they would vote on Tanden, meaning her nomination could have been doomed even with a "yes" from Murkowski.

Tanden's defenders said scuttling her nomination dripped of hypocrisy, noting that many of the senators who opposed her had gladly voted for sharp-tongued nominees such as Richard GrenellRichard GrenellCleveland businessman jumps into Ohio Senate race: Trump 'victories' need to be protected Tanden withdraws nomination as Biden budget chief Juan Williams: Hypocrisy runs riot in GOP MORE as U.S. ambassador to Germany despite derogatory comments about women's appearances and Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsGarland rescinds Trump-era memo curtailing consent decrees Biden picks vocal Trump critics to lead immigration agencies The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings MORE as attorney general despite comments on race that scuttled his nomination for a federal judgeship in 1986.

They also pointed to regular GOP support for former President TrumpDonald TrumpHouse votes to condemn Chinese government over Hong Kong Former Vice President Walter Mondale dies at age 93 White House readies for Chauvin verdict MORE despite his ongoing habit of incendiary rhetoric, through tweets and otherwise, which demeaned rivals as "crazy," "little," "crooked," "low IQ" and other epithets, including racial ones such as "Pocahontas."

Some Democrats have also noted that the Biden nominees facing the greatest level of scrutiny are people of color, including Rep. Deb HaalandDeb HaalandOvernight Energy: Treasury creates hub to fight climate change through finance | Sanders, Ocasio-Cortez introduce 'Green New Deal for Public Housing' | Tomorrow's energy economy demands reform at the Interior Department OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Interior says it isn't immediately reinstating coal leasing moratorium despite revoking Trump order | Haaland seeks to bolster environmental law targeted by Trump | Debate heats up over role of carbon offsets in Biden's 'net-zero' goal MORE (D-N.M.), the nominee to lead the Interior Department, and Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraOvernight Health Care: All adults in US now eligible for COVID-19 vaccine | White House launches media blitz to promote vaccines Top House Republicans ask Harris for meeting on border White House launches media effort to promote coronavirus vaccines MORE, the nominee for Health and Human Services secretary.

"Is there a pattern here??? Hope they’re using the same standard and not moving goal posts for only certain nominees," Rep. Grace MengGrace MengSenate aims to pass anti-Asian hate crimes bill this week Bold leadership is necessary to curb violence against youth Democrats work to pick up GOP support on anti-Asian hate crimes bill MORE (D-N.Y.) tweeted after Manchin came out against the Tanden nomination.

Some senators have already voiced support for Young should she be tapped to lead the agency. Young testified on Tuesday before the Senate Budget Committee.

“You’ll get my support, maybe for both jobs,” Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin Graham'Real Housewives of the GOP' — Wannabe reality show narcissists commandeer the party Graham: 'I could not disagree more' with Trump support of troop withdrawal Wall Street spent .9B on campaigns, lobbying in 2020 election: study MORE (R-S.C.) quipped during the hearing.

In the meantime, the budget office will remain without a confirmed leader. Press secretary Jen PsakiJen PsakiWhite House readies for Chauvin verdict The Memo: Russia tensions rise with Navalny's life in balance Top House Republicans ask Harris for meeting on border MORE previously said the release of Biden’s first budget proposal will likely be delayed due to the delay in transition from the Trump administration.

Updated: 7:30 p.m.