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Biden to unveil 'skinny' budget proposal next week

Biden to unveil 'skinny' budget proposal next week
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President BidenJoe BidenBiden taps California workplace safety leader to head up OSHA Romney blasts end of filibuster, expansion of SCOTUS US mulling cash payments to help curb migration MORE is set to release a "skinny" budget proposal for fiscal 2022 next week, which will contain top-line spending numbers for defense and domestic discretionary spending, as well as major priorities.

“Our priority is to provide Congress with early information about the President’s discretionary funding priorities, which is what they need to begin the appropriations process," White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) spokesman Rob Friedlander said.

"As is standard during transition years – and given the significant obstruction we faced during the transition – we will be releasing the President’s budget later this spring, which will show how his full agenda of investments and tax reforms fits together in a fiscally and economically responsible plan to address the overlapping crises we face,” he added. 

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The budget proposal will be the opening bid in a months-long process for Congress to approve some $1.4 trillion to fund the government in the fiscal year that starts in October, covering everything from defense to education to health to foreign policy.

While incoming administrations often miss the February deadline for submitting their budget proposals, previous administrations have released proposals by mid-March.

Biden's original nominee to head the budget office, Neera TandenNeera TandenFive ways an obscure Senate ruling could change Washington 2024 GOP White House hopefuls lead opposition to Biden Cabinet White House delays release of budget plan MORE, removed herself from consideration after it became clear that she lacked the votes to be confirmed over a history of mean Tweets toward political opponents.

Biden has yet to name a replacement, but is set to appoint incoming Deputy OMB Director Shalanda Young as the acting director in the interim. Young was confirmed earlier Tuesday, and has the support of top House Democrats to fill the role.

The administration was also focused on quickly passing the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package signed into law earlier this month.

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Republicans have hammered Biden for the delay.

"What does not seem to be a priority for the President is being transparent with the American people about what all of this will cost and how he plans to budget for it," House Budget Committee ranking member Jason SmithJason Thomas SmithWhite House delays release of budget plan Trump pollster: Greitens leads big in Missouri GOP Senate primary Missouri Senate candidate Eric Greitens tangles with Hugh Hewitt in testy interview MORE (R-Mo.) said last week.

"Rather than being left in the dark, American families deserve to know how high the Biden administration will raise their taxes or how much it will borrow against the country’s future in pursuit of its agenda,” he added.